Scaredy Bats: Australian public bash Aussie media for insulting Team India

India are bidding to win their first-ever Test series in Australia in the upcoming four-match rubber

ustralian media are at it again! Known for their aggressive and sometimes loathsome coverage of visiting cricketers, especially when it involves an away batsman at his peak, several newspapers Down Under have been successful in riling up opposition teams.

As it turns out, a leading news tabloid has called the Indian cricketers “The Scaredy Bats” upon their arrival in Adelaide for the first Test, starting December 6.

Australian journalist, Richard Hinds shared the photograph of the photo story that claims India have issues with the venues that are slated to host the much-anticipated four-Test series.

According to the report, India are “scared of the bounce” in Brisbane, “scared of the unknown” in Perth and “scared of the dark” in Adelaide, which comes as a sly dig at the visiting team’s reluctance to play day-night Test at the Adelaide Oval.

Even as the photograph of the tabloid clipping is going viral on social media, several cricket fans, including Australians, have lashed out at the reportage, calling it “childish” and “boorish tradition”.

[“source=indiatoday]

Insurance on EMI: A proposal stuck at concept stage

WhatsApp Chief has written to the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), seeking a formal nod to expand payments services to all its 200 million users in India. The messaging app, which has drawn fire from the government over spread of fake messages on its platform, continues to wait for a regulatory clearance to launch full-fledged payments operations in India – months after its ‘testing’ amassed nearly one million users, and almost two years since it first began discussions with the government on its payments services plans.

The development comes at a time when competitors such as Google have forged ahead with their payments offerings.

WhatsApp is currently piloting WhatsApp payments, and its Chief Chris Daniels has now written to the RBI urging that a formal approval be granted to take the payments product to all its users in the country.

“I write to request your formal approval to immediately expand WhatsApp’s BHIM UPI (Unified Payments Interface) compliant payments product to all users in India, giving us the opportunity to offer a useful and secure service that can improve the lives of Indian people through digital empowerment and financial inclusion,” Daniels said in the letter addressed to the RBI Governor.

The letter, dated November 5, mentions that WhatsApp’s partner banks have also submitted a request for formal approval.

When contacted, a WhatsApp spokesperson said the platform is working closely with the Indian government, National Payments Corporation of India (NPCI), and multiple banks, including payment service providers to expand the feature to more people and support the country’s digital economy.

“Today, almost 1 million people are testing WhatsApp payments in India. The feedback has been very positive, and people enjoy the convenience of sending money as simply and securely as sending messages,” the company’s spokesperson said, responding to a specific email query on the recent plea to the RBI.

In the letter, WhatsApp noted that the platform had rushed to ensure that the payments data is stored in India, immediately after the RBI came out with a directive outlining the new payments data storage requirements in April this year.

“Today, (the) RBI has unfettered supervisory access to payments data as prescribed by the RBI circular…,” said the letter. PTI has seen a copy of the letter.

The Facebook-owned company has also demanded a “level playing field” for all companies that offer payment services, including “a certain and transparent regulatory and operating environment”.

WhatsApp has also made a case for scaling up its operations by citing the productivity gains that have accrued to Indian small business as a result of the digital tool, and expressed its deep commitment to the market.

“Based on feedback from NPCI and our bank partners, we are confident that we are fully compliant with the UPI checklist, have made all necessary submissions and have passed the security audits required to launch WhatsApp Payments,” Daniels said.

It could not be immediately ascertained if the firm has received any response from the RBI to its letter.

WhatsApp’s ambitious payment services’ blueprint has been caught in a bind, over concerns around authentication and its data storage practices. In the past, its home grown rivals have alleged that WhatsApp’s payment platform has security risks for consumers and is not in compliance with the guidelines.

WhatsApp has been under tremendous pressure to put in place a mechanism to curb fake news on its messaging platform that incited mob fury in India. Over a dozen people have been killed across the country this year in mob lynchings, fuelled by rumours circulating on WhatsApp.

The rumours ranged from suspicion of stealing children to victims being believed to be killing cows. Riots have been instigated by people forwarding and misinterpreting videos on WhatsApp.

The government has, on several occasions, warned the company that it can’t evade responsibility if its messaging service is used to spread false information. The Centre has directed WhatsApp to develop tools to combat fake or false messages, and, more importantly, to identify message originators.

Apart from the traceability request, the government had asked WhatsApp to set up a local corporate presence and appoint a grievance officer to address complaints.

[“source=designresearchcenter].

Want your child to study abroad? Here are the best cities for international students

1. London | Highest-ranked institution: UCL (University College London) | Population: 13,880,000 | Average international fees: $21,200 | Employer Activity rank: 2 (Image: Reuters)

1. London | Highest-ranked institution: UCL (University College London) | Population: 13,880,000 | Average international fees: $21,200 | Employer Activity rank: 2 (Image: Reuters)

2. Tokyo | Highest-ranked institution: University of Tokyo | Population: 37,800,000 | Average international fees: $6,700 | Employer Activity rank: 1 (Image: Reuters)

2/10

2. Tokyo | Highest-ranked institution: University of Tokyo | Population: 37,800,000 | Average international fees: $6,700 | Employer Activity rank: 1 (Image: Reuters)

3. Melbourne | Highest-ranked institution: University of Melbourne | Population: 4,530,000 | Average international fees: $23,300 | Employer Activity rank: 10 (Image: Reuters)

3/10

3. Melbourne | Highest-ranked institution: University of Melbourne | Population: 4,530,000 | Average international fees: $23,300 | Employer Activity rank: 10 (Image: Reuters)

4. Montréal | Highest-ranked institution: McGill University | Population: 4,127,000 | Average international fees: $13,200 | Employer Activity rank: 20 (Image: Reuters)

4/10

4. Montréal | Highest-ranked institution: McGill University | Population: 4,127,000 | Average international fees: $13,200 | Employer Activity rank: 20 (Image: Reuters)

5. Paris | Highest-ranked institution: ENS Paris | Population: 12,405,000 | Average international fees: $3,400 | Employer Activity rank: 7 (Image: Reuters)

5/10

5. Paris | Highest-ranked institution: ENS Paris | Population: 12,405,000 | Average international fees: $3,400 | Employer Activity rank: 7 (Image: Reuters)

6. Munich | Highest-ranked institution: Technische Universität München | Population: 2,600,000 | Average international fees: $100 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

6/10

6. Munich | Highest-ranked institution: Technische Universität München | Population: 2,600,000 | Average international fees: $100 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

7. Berlin | Highest-ranked institution: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Population: 6,005,000 | Average international fees: $2000 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

7/10

7. Berlin | Highest-ranked institution: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Population: 6,005,000 | Average international fees: $2000 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

8. Zurich | Highest-ranked institution: ETH Zurich | Population: 1,900,000 | Average international fees: $1,900 | Employer Activity rank: 6 (Image: Reuters)

8/10

8. Zurich | Highest-ranked institution: ETH Zurich | Population: 1,900,000 | Average international fees: $1,900 | Employer Activity rank: 6 (Image: Reuters)

9. Sydney | Highest-ranked institution: The University of New South Wales | Population: 4,921,000 | Average international fees: $26,400 | Employer Activity rank: 13 (Image: Reuters)

9/10

9. Sydney | Highest-ranked institution: The University of New South Wales | Population: 4,921,000 | Average international fees: $26,400 | Employer Activity rank: 13 (Image: Reuters)

10. Seoul | Highest-ranked institution: Seoul National University (SNU) | Population: 25,000,000 | Average international fees: $6,500 | Employer Activity rank: 4 (Image: Reuters)

10/10

10. Seoul | Highest-ranked institution: Seoul National University (SNU) | Population: 25,000,000 | Average international fees: $6,500 | Employer Activity rank: 4 (Image: Reuters)

source:-moneycontl

Alumna Njeim Shares Atlantis Program Study-Abroad Experience

Njeim (center) at the Buganu Festival in Swaziland, where Njeim collected thesis data.

Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences provides a robust array of study abroad opportunities designed to develop life-long partnerships, promote cultural awareness, and provide an understanding of the global dimensions of students’ majors. One such opportunity, the Atlantis Program housed within the Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness department, presents a unique chance for students to earn a double master’s degree in agricultural economics from the University of Arkansas and a joint degree in rural development issued by one of six European partner universities.

Alumna Noussayma Njeim is a recent graduate of the Atlantis program. Originally from Beirut, Lebanon, Njeim earned her bachelor’s degree in public administration and political science before enrolling in the Atlantis Program at the University of Arkansas.

Njeim, who graduated this summer 2018, reflects fondly on her Atlantis Program experience, citing the exposure to a student cohort of varying demographics and different methods of teaching (as well as the opportunity to see the world) as the most significant features.

“The program gives the opportunity to travel and experience how international people think about different topics and how they approach problems. This taught me to think in different ways and also to think outside of my traditional line of thinking.”

While Njeim faced challenges during her travels, she praises her support system for buoying her resolve and ultimately leading her to realize that people are emotionally and intellectually stronger than they think they are.

“I would highly recommend the Atlantis Program; it has helped me grow both personally and professionally. It was an amazing way to experience life in a different aspect and also to challenge oneself.”

Now graduated, Njeim plans to enhance development by implementing efficient and effective projects that tackle the myriad of socioeconomic issues afflicting underprivileged Lebanese. With a career in development, she hopes to be able to evaluate project proposals and assess their direct effects on the socioeconomic status of families, become part of project funding procedures, and be an active project coordinator with the capacity to monitor and evaluate project implementation.

“I highly recommend students join the Atlantis Program for several reasons. Specifically, it helps to challenge some stereotypes people might have and also allows students to see that the world doesn’t revolve around one place, country, or problem. The world is so big, and it has been amazing to experience it!”

Source:-news.uark.e

These HR Startups Are Using Tech To Optimize Recruiting For Some Of India’s Biggest Companies

India is one of the fastest growing nations in Asia, with a burgeoning workforce to match. According to the India Employment Report, more than 460 million people above the age of 14 years were employed in 2015-16, which is nine million more than a decade ago. India alone produced 6.3 million graduates and 1.4 million post-graduate students in 2015.

And those numbers are only increasing. In the next decade, India will account for more than half of Asia’s workforce. So how do corporates cope with this ever-increasing influx of skilled candidates? Are these skilled workers landing jobs that are suited to their skill sets? A wave of Indian startups are tapping into technologies such as artificial intelligence, machine learning and predictive analytics to build plug-and-play platforms for large companies with the aim of assisting large companies to address their recruitment needs and simplify complex hiring processes.

Customizing the perfect job for the perfect candidate

Belong.co, a Bangalore-based SaaS startup is bullish on outbound hiring, which taps into social talent data and predictive analysis to engage the right candidates for a job, flipping the conventional way of hiring where recruiters wait for the most suited candidates to apply. Co-founder Rishabh Kaul says, “There are some broad trends we have witnessed in the market today and one is that people are not reliant on job portals as much as they were earlier. There are more choices available while job hunting and the main question is–can someone find a job that they actually like? This has led to candidates having varied expectations from jobs.”

Belong’s machine learning algorithms analyze publicly available data of talent on online community networks and social media to intelligently match candidates to relevant opportunities. Being data rich, Kaul hopes to bridge the gap between human resourcing and business goals. Belong works extensively with enterprise companies such as Cisco, Paypal, Adobe, ABB, Tesco, ThoughtWorks and Tavant Technologies among others. Some of their other clients include Flipkart, Myntra, Ola, InMobi and Directi. “Initially, we started hiring in product management, IoT and data science streams. Now, we have moved on to hiring for larger engineering roles as well as sales and marketing,” says Kaul.

Since 2015, Belong has doubled its number of mid-market and enterprise customers, and has seen a 411% year-on-year increase in the number of offers generated on its platform.

Hackathons have proven to be an unbiased, and skill-driven method to hire quality coders for large enterprises. (Photo By John Leyba/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Another startup that exclusively taps into advanced HR technology to make precise recruitment decisions is Darwinbox. According to cofounder Jayant Paleti, technology can be used for more strategic business purposes such as understanding human behavior, seeking talent and overall, driving a workplace culture. Paleti says, “We have been able to develop multi-layered insights to employee behavior based on the immense amount of data analyzed on our platform. Our AI engine allows a recruiter to analyze a job description and employee profile, and picks keywords to arrive at a certain ranking metric. So, if there are 400 applicants for a job, the system will shortlist about 10-15 applicants for the recruiter to talk to. Cost saving, increased productivity, better talent acquisition and higher talent retention has resulted in 40% RoI for our clients.”

Darwinbox, an end-to-end HR technology platform, serves more than 100 clients, including PayTM, Nivea, Myntra, Dr Reddy’s Laboratories, Swiggy, eKart and Times Internet among others.

Grooming coders for India’s technology needs

Given the critical and centralized role played by technology in companies today, there is a growing need for qualified coders and software engineers. This is where Hackerearth is making a difference in an unconventional way–by inviting coders from across the country to its hackathons to display their skills. This has given rise to a pool of highly skilled coders, many who have been recruited by companies based on their most relevant software skills.

The idea for Hackerearth originated in IIT Roorkee, one of India’s premier engineering institutes, where Sachin Gupta and Vivek Prakash, cofounders of Hackerearth, were students. “Campus recruitment in India can sometimes be subjective and biased, which is detrimental to technical hiring. If you’re a good coder and can prove what you know theoretically, it doesn’t matter where you study or how you come across during an interview at a certain time. Technical hiring has to be bias-free and skill-driven,” said Gupta.

This led Gupta and Prakash to create a platform that allows coders to develop a browser, whose codes could be evaluated by a skilled hiring panel based on a SWOT analysis. This automated skill assessment is intended to reduce hours spent by recruiters manually searching for coders, and screen the right candidates for companies based on their requirements. Hackerearth has helped companies like Amazon, Intuit, Walmart Labs, Honeywell, IBM Nasdaq OMX and Societe Generale. Recently, the company initiated a platform called Startup Connect that connects early stage startups with large companies in a bid to foster innovation and help enterprises solve business challenges. Currently, more than 500 startups have signed up on this platform and Hackerearth aims to have around 50 companies on its platform by the end of 2018.

Keeping the “human” in human resources

While it may appear that these hot tech startups could quickly replace the role of a HR professional, the three cofounders strongly disagree. Paleti says, “Research has shown that recruiters spend 38-40 hours per week just to schedule interviews. With big enterprises, this is a mammoth waste of time. Since our platform computes a lot of data quickly, recruiters feel their productivity levels have gone up by 30-40% and incidentally, they are able to spend more time being more human on the job, instead of wasting precious hours chasing operational tasks.”

Gupta believes that technology has played a huge role in identifying the right employees for companies, and eliminating poor fits as well. This results in better employee retention, reduced attrition and improved company morale.

source:-.forbes.co

Aspiring Medico Turned Away From AIIMS MBBS Exam As Aadhar QR Code Couldn’t Be Scanned, Delhi HC Notice To Centre, AIIMS, UIDAI

As the results of AIIMS MBBS entrance examination is to be announced on June 18, the Delhi High Court has sought to know the stand of the Centre, AIIMS and the Unique Identification Authority of India on a petition filed by an aspiring medical studen…

Abhimanyu Bishnoi moved high court narrating how he was turned away from the examination centre in Gulbarga, Karnataka on May 25 with the mandatory admit card, photographs and his original Aadhaar card. To his shock, when he produced the Aadhar c… …

To his shock, when he produced the Aadhar card for verification at the gate of the examination centre, the staff engaged in the verification process told him that the QR Code on his card could not be scanned and that his Aadhar Card is not genuine….

He was not allowed to sit for the examination for which, he said, he had been preparing for over two years. In his petition filed through advocate Akshay Srivastava, Senior Associate at PSP Legal along with Advocate Prakhar Deep, Associate at Link L…

They also contended that the applicant was issued the admit card only after he had provided all his details including the Aadhar number in the online application. His counsel also informed the court that the QR Code of Aadhar card was being verified…

They have urged the court to quash the AIIMS Entrance Examination – 2018 and direct a fresh examination to be conducted within a reasonable period while also seeking a stay on the publication of final result cum merit list till the disposal of this P…

The counsel submitted that grave injustice would be caused to the petitioner if the results of the exam is declared without providing him another opportunity….

Source:-livelaw.in/

The Dept. of Education Plans to Stop Using Private Debt Collectors

The Dept. of Education Plans to Stop Using Private Debt Collectors

The Department of Education will stop using private debt collectors to handle overdue loan payments. This decision came to light after a May 23 legal filing by department attorneys. In February, the department announced it ended contracts with several private collection agencies for giving borrowers inaccurate information.

Attorneys for the Department of Education asked the U.S. Court of Federal Claims to dismiss a lawsuit filed by several debt collection agencies. In the filing, they said the Department of Education plans to change its debt collection practices, thus rendering the lawsuit useless, The Washington Post reported.

Rather than relying on private agencies, the department plans to let the companies that service the loans collect on overdue payments. The department lawyers said this move will shift the focus to better customer service and proactive outreach to give options to borrowers who are late on payments. This will allow borrowers to make other arrangements before they end up defaulting on their loans.

This should come as a welcome change to consumer advocate groups who have long criticized the department’s use of debt collection agencies. Debt collection agencies can be aggressive in their approach and don’t work to help borrowers come up with a solution for managing their debt.

Clare McCann, a former policy adviser during the Obama Administration, said that not only are debt collectors unwilling to help borrowers but they actually “complicate the process by taking defaulted students out of one system and putting them into another.”

Furthermore, using collection agencies also costs the federal government quite a bit of money. In January, congressional Democrats sent a letter to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, noting that collection costs take 20 cents on the dollar.

Last year, the federal government spent over $700 million to collect on the loans of less than seven million defaulted borrowers. This is equivalent to what the government pays to service 33 million borrowers who pay their loans every month, The Post reported.

This recent move by the department is part of their bigger plan to overhaul the way student loans are serviced. They are currently working on Next Gen, which is the department’s attempt to modernize the ways student loans are processed and simplify the way borrowers repay their loans.

It isn’t entirely clear how this will play out, but eliminating debt collection agencies from the picture will likely be good news for most borrowers. Hopefully, borrowers will be able to find more options to help them get in good standing on the debt and avoid default.

Source:-studentloans

DMRC Recruitment 2018: Application invited for Dy. General Manager (Design) and Manager (Design) posts

DMRC Recruitment 2018: Application invited for Dy. General Manager (Design) and Manager (Design) posts

DMRC Recruitment 2018: Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) has issued notification to fill up various positions. The positions for which the applications are invited are Dy. General Manager (Design) and  Manager (Design). The last date for reaching the applications to the department concern for the recruitment to the post of Dy. General Manager (Design) and  Manager (Design) is June 26. Eligible candidates can apply for the positions on or before 26 June 2018. For details, candidates must visit delhimetrorail.com. All the information will be availabe on the website.
Applicants have to send the completed forms to the Chief General Manager (HR), Delhi Metro Rail Corporation Ltd, Metro Bhawan, Fire Brigade Lane, Barakhamba Road, New Delhi’.

DMRC Recruitment 2018: Vacancy Details:
There are 2 Dy. General Manager (Design) posts and  3 Manager (Design) posts.

Eligibility Criteria:
The applicants should hold B.E./  B.Tech (Civil)    (4  Years)  with minimum  60 percent marks or equivalent CGPA from a government recognised University/institute.M.Tech (Structural Enggineering) desirable.

Dy. General Manager (Design): The applicants must be employed with the Government Organisation /PSUs for a period of at least 9 years in related posts.

Manager (Design): The candidate must have 9 years experience with government Organisation/PSUs in related field.
Age limit: The candidate should not be more than 45 years of age.

Candidates must read the notification carefully before applying for the position, as any mistake can lead to the rejection of the form.

Selection process:
This is a three-stage process, first there will be interview and the sencond round is Group Discussion followed by Medical Examination. Details  of Medical Examination are available on DMRC website.

Selected  candidates for Dy. General Manager (Design) and Manager (Design) will have to execute a surety bond of Rs. 4,00,000 and Rs. 3,00,000, respectively. They will also have to bear the cost of training and applicable service tax to serve the corporation for a minimum period of three years.

Source:-.zeebiz.c

South Suburban woman’s student loans snowball when lenders transfer loans without notice

Image result for South Suburban woman's student loans snowball when lenders transfer loans without notice

A south suburban woman is demanding answers from the Department of Education after her son’s student loans were transferred to different companies and snowballed out of control. She said she wasn’t getting the bills.

“I will be forever on the hamster wheel,” Sharon Mack said of paying off the loans.

Mack took out approximately $24,000 worth of loans for her son in 2009. Now the Palos Hills woman owes the Department of Education almost $38,000.

“Because all of the loans were being bought and sold by different lenders, I didn’t receive anything in the mail saying it was now bought and transferred,” she said.

Mack says she didn’t know the loans were transferred three times and that she didn’t receive bills. That’s when they snowballed with interest and late fees. When she defaulted, the loans transferred from the private servicer to a debt collector and then back to the Department of Education.

“They put me in default status, income tax check comes around and they seize the second check so then I call them and I say I am making my payments you are taking it out of my checking account every month,” Mack said.

Mack wants the Department of Education to put her in good standing and stop seizing her federal income tax checks. She provided the I-Team documentation showing monthly payments to the Department of Education, she says since April 2016.

“It’s taken a toll on us, we just want it to be fair and honest,” she said.

The Illinois Attorney General’s Office said it’s working with Mack to get answers from the federal agency. The office is also working with the last lender and the collection agency to help get Mack get back into good standing, since she now has a history of payments.

“I would not ruin my credit over a student loan. This has plummeted my credit,” Mack said.

The Department of Education said it’s looking into the I-Team’s questions about Mack’s case but had not responded to the I-Team as of Friday evening.

It’s legal for lenders to transfer student loans, but they must alert consumers if the servicer changes. Under a new state law written by the Illinois attorney general, they will have to alert consumers 15 days before the transfer instead of 45 days after.

“Not everyone has a college fund, you want your kids to go to college and have a good education and have a good life and you take out a loan and without your knowledge it keeps being bought and sold by different lenders,” Mack said.

Borrowers also have a responsibility to inquire if they’re strangely not seeing bills or debits from a lender.

That loan is not going to disappear – it’s most likely been transferred or sold.

Also, Illinois law says that student loan lenders must offer a lower payment option to borrowers in financial trouble.

Source:-abc7chicago.

How Much Do You Own Your Career?

Suppose you buy the principle from my previous article that you need to own your career. You understand that you live in an innovation-driven economy, your learning must keep pace and employability is your responsibility. How, then, can you apply the principle of career ownership to yourself?

Career ownership is a natural extension of living in a democratic society, and exercising choice. Moreover, your career is not a physical artifact, like a dining table, that can stay in the same condition for a lifetime. Your career is always in a state of flux: shaping, and being shaped by, the outside environment. Here are some questions you can ask to test where you stand right now.

Where can you go? This first question calls for you to look beyond what’s familiar. What is the wider market for the work you can do, and the further learning that you seek? Do you have the skills to do something different? What do you know about employers that may value your talents? Are there opportunities for you to work in virtual space, from your own home? Whom can you talk to in order to find out more information? Are there part-time, or contract work or volunteer opportunities that can help you go in a new direction?

Who’s supporting you? Owning your career ought not to be a solitary activity. On the contrary, having friends, family, colleagues, and mentors who support you is an essential part of career ownership. Within this overall group you can identify a smaller group, an imaginary “board of directors” that you hold in high regard. What does your imaginary board look like? What kind of board vacancy would you like to fill? You can expect fluidity among your supporters, including adding new ones in return for favors you did them. In this way, effective “give and take” can play an important part in developing your support system over time.

Where’s your reputation? This question differs from the previous one. Its focus is on the people—bosses, customers, project team members, occupational peers and so on—who have directly experienced your work and respect what you can do. Over time, you can expect your reputation to become scattered across a wider area. Moreover, you don’t need to move to grow your reputation. That can happen through other people moving, and taking your reputation to new places. Many career moves stem from an unanticipated phone call from a former co-worker who knows your worth.

Who’s your agent? You will be familiar with the idea of an agent from the worlds of professional sports, or movie-making or the theater. You may not think you need any equivalent in your own career. However, it’s important to see that your agent may not be an individual person, but a function performed by a range of people. It’s common for bosses, co-workers, headhunters, and contractors from the past to want to work with you again. It’s useful to map out who those people are, and to keep in touch so that they stand ready to help again as your career moves forward.

What’s the next step? The most important point here is that you take a next step, and in turn another, and another. You may be under a lot of pressure to deliver results in your present job, or have little free time, or have family obligations that restrict what you’d really like to do. However, to practice career ownership you owe it to yourself to do something, however small a step that may be. That something can lead to a fresh round of experimentation that leads in turn to a new door of opportunity.sking where can you go, who’s supporting you, where’s your reputation, who’s your agent and what’s the next step can make you a more informed contributor to a democratic society. They can also take you a long way toward owning your career.

Source:-.forbes