Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compare

Image result for Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compareLawyer Rohan Mahajan got an unexpected call a few years back. Nirbhaya’s parents were calling for help when the case reached the Supreme Court. Mahajan brought in senior counsels to help on a pro bono basis (free of cost). “Everyone is helpless when it comes to legal support. While financial success is not guaranteed, you get the opportunity to help people and do something right,” said Mahajan.

This is only one of the reasons why law is an evergreen career opt

Suppose you buy the principle from my previous article that you need to own your career. You understand that you live in an innovation-driven economy, your learning must keep pace and employability is your responsibility. How, then, can you apply the principle of career ownership to yourself?

Career ownership is a natural extension of living in a democratic society, and exercising choice. Moreover, your career is not a physical artifact, like a dining table, that can stay in the same condition for a lifetime. Your career is always in a state of flux: shaping, and being shaped by, the outside environment. Here are some questions you can ask to test where you stand right now.

Where can you go? This first question calls for you to look beyond what’s familiar. What is the wider market for the work you can do, and the further learning that you seek? Do you have the skills to do something different? What do you know about employers that may value your talents? Are there opportunities for you to work in virtual space, from your own home? Whom can you talk to in order to find out more information? Are there part-time, or contract work or volunteer opportunities that can help you go in a new direction?

Who’s supporting you? Owning your career ought not to be a solitary activity. On the contrary, having friends, family, colleagues, and mentors who support you is an essential part of career ownership. Within this overall group you can identify a smaller group, an imaginary “board of directors” that you hold in high regard. What does your imaginary board look like? What kind of board vacancy would you like to fill? You can expect fluidity among your supporters, including adding new ones in return for favors you did them. In this way, effective “give and take” can play an important part in developing your support system over time.

Where’s your reputation? This question differs from the previous one. Its focus is on the people—bosses, customers, project team members, occupational peers and so on—who have directly experienced your work and respect what you can do. Over time, you can expect your reputation to become scattered across a wider area. Moreover, you don’t need to move to grow your reputation. That can happen through other people moving, and taking your reputation to new places. Many career moves stem from an unanticipated phone call from a former co-worker who knows your worth.

Who’s your agent? You will be familiar with the idea of an agent from the worlds of professional sports, or movie-making or the theater. You may not think you need any equivalent in your own career. However, it’s important to see that your agent may not be an individual person, but a function performed by a range of people. It’s common for bosses, co-workers, headhunters, and contractors from the past to want to work with you again. It’s useful to map out who those people are, and to keep in touch so that they stand ready to help again as your career moves forward.

What’s the next step? The most important point here is that you take a next step, and in turn another, and another. You may be under a lot of pressure to deliver results in your present job, or have little free time, or have family obligations that restrict what you’d really like to do. However, to practice career ownership you owe it to yourself to do something, however small a step that may be. That something can lead to a fresh round of experimentation that leads in turn to a new door of opportunity.sking where can you go, who’s supporting you, where’s your reputation, who’s your agent and what’s the next step can make you a more informed contributor to a democratic society. They can also take you a long way toward owning your career.

Source:-.forbes

ion. It has a certain degree of prestige attached to it. Whether it is Ram Jethmalani and Mukul Rohatgi who have taken it up as a profession or the likes of P Chidambaram and Arun Jaitley who are lawyers by qualification, they are all well known.

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Besides, the country is always pressed for those with knowledge of legal matters. “As people become more educated and aware of the law, we find the number of court cases increasing, which means that there is great demand for lawyers. In a country which has a population of 1.3 billion, the number of lawyers is a minuscule 1 million. India needs more lawyers to cater to this burgeoning population,” said Ashwin Madhavan,founder, Enhelion, a legal education company.

Law offers a variety of sub-specialities that one can choose from. For those interested in the corporate and business aspects, there is corporate law. For those intrigued by crime, there is criminal law. Today, several niche areas have arisen from traditional practices such as civil or criminal litigation. For instance, one can specialise in laws related to media and entertainment. Rising awareness of environmental issues such as the use of clean technology, renewable energy, managing carbon assets and keeping greenhouse gas inventories has created work for environmental law attorneys, adds Mahajan. Taxation and banking remain areas that corporates are always looking for professional help on and a specialisation in this area could be useful.

Experts in the space add that these labels can be convenient but the work involves understanding the core tenets. For instance, specialising in sports law or entertainment law also involves looking at these areas through the realm of commerce or commercial law.

Being a lawyer is also about being multi-skilled. Madhavan of Enhelion says effective oral communication, strong research and analytical skills along with good interpersonal skills and the ability to understand and listen to the client are all crucial skills to have.

Once one becomes a lawyer, there are multiple avenues to look at. “As a lawyer, you have the option to set up your law firm to learn the ropes, become a part of the judiciary, or enjoy the thrills of a corporate practice by being an in-house counsel to a multi-national company,” says Mahajan.

Many young lawyers with an entrepreneurial streak set up their own practice early in their career. For instance, Mahajan has set up LawRato.com as an online legal marketplace.One can also choose to specialise in a particular area or focus on a select set of areas. Rodney D Ryder, founding partner of Scriboard Advocates and Legal Consultants dons many hats. From managing the complete trademark portfolio for cricketer MS Dhoni and some teams, he also works in the area of information technology and Intellectual Property. Ryder also works with startups as they develop their ideas and products by helping them protect their ideas from being infringed upon. “There are always new and interesting areas to be explored. For instance, today the interface being technology or internet and law is an exciting new path. With all the discussion on data privacy, this is an offbeat track to look at,” said Ryder.
Other than these regular career paths, lawyers are also holding influential positions in the government sectors to work as policy makers for affecting a national/global change, adds Mahajan.

Being a lawyer gives you an opportunity to do some good while you work. For instance, Mahajan’s LawRato.com offers free legal aid for certain people such as victims of crime, war heroes and war widows.

While early years can be a struggle financially, as one moves up the ladder, the profession can be very lucrative. Senior counsels who are consulted by top business honchos and politicians are known charge several lakhs for an hour of their time.

source:-timesofindia.indiatimes

How to Recharge Your Career In The Second Half Of Life

Story image for Career from Forbes

Researchers are predicting that scientific advances could have millennials living to 100 or longer; the standard 30- to 40-year career could be extended by a decade or two. Combine that with the speed of technological advances, plus the fact that jobs we have never heard of will emerge as the hottest roles to have. What will the future of careers look like and how can we prepare for that now?

I sat down with an old friend, Marci Alboher, who is a leading expert in encore careers – finding meaningful work in the second half of life. When I first met Marci, she had coined the term “slash” as it relates to careers and lifestyle. She had just published her first book, One Person/Multiple Careers – a roadmap for building a life that embraces the slash lifestyle and the concept of custom-blending a career.

Today she is one of the leaders in the encore movement, serving as a VP at Encore.org, which is innovating new models to tap the talent of people 50+ as a force for good. Her latest latest book, The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life, takes some of her earlier thinking and applies it to retirement: reinvented, re-envisioned, and reinvigorated.

I asked her what mindset we need to adopt so we can remain relevant and fulfilled in the rapidly changing landscape of extended careers. She shared four fundamental actions we can take to ensure success and happiness in that second chapter.

1. Cultivate your slashes.

William Arruda: What does “cultivate your slashes” mean, and how do we go about doing it?

Marci Alboher: When I wrote the slash book more than ten years ago, I had noticed that juggling various work identities concurrently — the website designer / yoga instructor, caterer / teacher — was starting to go mainstream. Slashing is now less exotic. In fact, millennials just consider this the normal way of living!  If you can work anywhere with an internet connection, it’s easy to shift between very different kinds of work activities. A few things to consider: First, think about a balance that gets you using different parts of your brain or that gets you spending your time in different ways. If you spend a lot of your time staring at a computer screen for example, it’s great to complement that with something that gets you out in the world or using your hands in some way. Second, recognize that we become expert at things when we immerse fully for a while. So pace yourself, giving yourself time to do that before jumping into a new arena. Finally, recognize that some pursuits are easy to pair and others more complicated.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

How To Recharge Your Career In The Second Half Of Life

Story image for Career from Forbes

Researchers are predicting that scientific advances could have millennials living to 100 or longer; the standard 30- to 40-year career could be extended by a decade or two. Combine that with the speed of technological advances, plus the fact that jobs we have never heard of will emerge as the hottest roles to have. What will the future of careers look like and how can we prepare for that now?

I sat down with an old friend, Marci Alboher, who is a leading expert in encore careers – finding meaningful work in the second half of life. When I first met Marci, she had coined the term “slash” as it relates to careers and lifestyle. She had just published her first book, One Person/Multiple Careers – a roadmap for building a life that embraces the slash lifestyle and the concept of custom-blending a career.

Today she is one of the leaders in the encore movement, serving as a VP at Encore.org, which is innovating new models to tap the talent of people 50+ as a force for good. Her latest latest book, The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life, takes some of her earlier thinking and applies it to retirement: reinvented, re-envisioned, and reinvigorated.

I asked her what mindset we need to adopt so we can remain relevant and fulfilled in the rapidly changing landscape of extended careers. She shared four fundamental actions we can take to ensure success and happiness in that second chapter.

1. Cultivate your slashes.

William Arruda: What does “cultivate your slashes” mean, and how do we go about doing it?

Marci Alboher: When I wrote the slash book more than ten years ago, I had noticed that juggling various work identities concurrently — the website designer / yoga instructor, caterer / teacher — was starting to go mainstream. Slashing is now less exotic. In fact, millennials just consider this the normal way of living!  If you can work anywhere with an internet connection, it’s easy to shift between very different kinds of work activities. A few things to consider: First, think about a balance that gets you using different parts of your brain or that gets you spending your time in different ways. If you spend a lot of your time staring at a computer screen for example, it’s great to complement that with something that gets you out in the world or using your hands in some way. Second, recognize that we become expert at things when we immerse fully for a while. So pace yourself, giving yourself time to do that before jumping into a new arena. Finally, recognize that some pursuits are easy to pair and others more complicated.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

University study abroad: good for the character and the bank balance

A young student walking away from the camera.

It can be tough when your son or daughter moves away to university. And that challenge is only amplified if they’re going to another country. In fact, the whole process can be more stressful for parents than students, says Anna Moscrop, study abroad manager at the University of Exeter. But having a student child go abroad needn’t be filled with worry.

Students are increasingly keen to jet off for a degree or a semester. Some can’t resist an adventure, the chance to explore a new culture, or maybe even to soak up a bit more sunshine. For others, cost is the deciding factor; many European countries charge much less than the UK’s annual £9,000-plus tuition fees. Many young people also think that spending time abroad will improve their career prospects, a British Council study found.

British students can study in many places around the world, with many packing their bags for destinations across English-speaking nations such the US, Canada or Australia. On top of this, the number of courses taught in English in Europe is growing. International students can study in Germany or Norway for free. In France, average annual tuition fees are just £160 for most undergraduate programmes, while in Spain, the average cost is £577-£1,086 per year. Tuition fees in the US and Australia are higher – and both countries require a student visa – but scholarship options are available to international students.

With so much choice, parents will want to help students research destinations and cost. Rob Randall, a student who studied in Florida, says he was “very grateful” his dad helped him to do some research. And that research will be valuable to parents in the months to come. “You’ll be more able to understand that they will cope,” says Katrien Verbruggen, a study abroad manager at the University of East Anglia.

If studying full-time for a degree abroad seems like too much of a leap of faith for your son or daughter – and, perhaps, you – then the Erasmus programme may be of interest. Erasmus placements to Europe and beyond last for between two and 12 months, usually during a student’s second or third year. Organised through British universities, these placements provide students with a grant; the amount they get is dependent upon the destination.

The scope of Erasmus placements available to a student depends on their British university’s links to universities abroad – information that is normally available on their website. Students should consider the cost of different destinations and look into the course they would be studying. “Don’t get too distracted by the big poster attractions,” says Randall. “You’ve got to look at the whole university experience, like the course and accommodation.”

If your son or daughter is about to jet off, there are many ways to keep in touch. “We organised weekly Skype sessions,” says Randall, “and our family WhatsApp group was a nice reminder of life back home.” And don’t panic if they experience homesickness – culture shock is normal, says Moscrop. Support is in place at most foreign universities and young people often cope better than you expect them to, she adds.

Daniel Baker studied for his degree in Paris. He says parents tend to “overestimate rebelliousness and underestimate life skills”. If there’s a problem it will most likely just be getting lost, locked out, or losing something, he says.

Although the experience may be nerve-wracking, most students appreciate the benefits of studying abroad, says Naquita Lewis, higher education lead for Erasmus+ at the British Council. “They become stronger, more self-confident, self-aware, mature, and develop great life skills,” she says.

Kim O’Rourke says she has noticed a “huge difference” in her son, Conor, who studies at Cardiff Metropolitan University, but went to the US for a summer last year: “He’s broadened his horizons. It has been fantastic to see.”

‘New York is a long way. She was very nervous, naturally’

Robert Thomas, who lives in Penarth, Wales, tells us how he felt when his daughter, Lowri, went to study Arabic at Columbia University

Robert Thomas and his daughter, Lowri, on Penarth pier
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 Robert Thomas and his daughter, Lowri, on Penarth pier Photograph: Gareth Phillips for the Guardian

When Lowri first told me she wanted to study at Columbia University I didn’t know where it was. Then when she told me it was in New York I thought: “Uh oh”. But it’s a different place to when my wife and I went there 20 years ago; it’s much safer now.

When Lowri left last August, I went to America with her brother and mum to say goodbye. That made all the difference. We helped her to move into her halls of residence and it was brilliantly organised. There were buses to take parents to shops to buy things like bedding.

On the last day we said goodbye, but it wasn’t until I got home that it really hit me. I opened the fridge to get some milk for my tea and saw an unopened box of olives. She loves olives and that’s when it hit me that she wouldn’t be eating them. I had a cry then.

Columbia had an introductory session for parents and it helped so much. Even before she went, they wrote to us as her parents and effectively said: “We know you’ll be worried about her but don’t be – we’ll look after her.” And that is so reassuring.

She was very nervous, naturally. It’s a long way from home. She can’t bring her washing home at the weekend. If she’s feeling a bit homesick she can’t pop back for a bowl of cawl.

But there’s a thriving Welsh community in New York and there are some Welsh societies and she’s met people there.

The great thing about modern technology is you can keep in touch in a myriad of ways. Being able to actually see the person you’re talking to on a video call – that’s very reassuring. But she uses the whole range of social media – Instagram, WhatsApp, Facebook. So you get a very comprehensive picture of what she’s doing.

I think it’s an extraordinary opportunity she has. The education she’s getting is Ivy league and as an international student she’s met people from all over the world. She’s become very independent. For example, she’s planning to go to San Francisco with her friend.

I think my main advice for other parents is to do as much research as you can before they go away. You can talk to people, find out about the teachers and even see who goes to the university – all before they go.

Beyond Britain: tips for studying abroad

Tour tips: a few local phrases can make all the difference
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 Tour tips: a few local phrases can make all the difference Photograph: Minori Ueda/Getty Images/EyeEm

Whether they’re jetting off to sun-soaked Barcelona, or preparing to hit the beach in Sydney, your child is sure to be excited about the adventure that awaits. The parent’s role here is clear: to make sure none of the practical necessities get forgotten in the maelstrom of anticipation. Here’s a few pointers:

Travel and health insurance
For countries like America, Australia and New Zealand, you’ll need to take out the host university health insurance if you want to get a student visa. If you’re in Europe, a European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) will cover you for emergencies and temporary stays, but you may still need to get insurance as well.

Visas
Read through all the information the host university sends about visas and make sure your child does too, says Moscrop, so everyone is clear about what needs to be done.

Know what to do in an emergency
Check where the nearest embassy will be and put emergency phone numbers into your phone. Doing this in advance can be invaluable if you run into problems when you’re abroad, says Moscrop.

Photocopy everything
It’s a good idea to photocopy all of your important documents, including your passport. And if you need ID for a night out, don’t take your passport, says Baker: “If you lose your driving licence, you can’t drive abroad, but if you lose your passport, you can’t leave.”

Sort out your money
TransferWise and the Post Office have international travel cards, but Baker says the best tactic is to open a local bank account and use TransferWise to add money. “This will help if you want to work abroad too,” he says.

Learn a few local phrases
Know your “hola” from your “hallo”, even if your course will be in English, says Baker: “In my experience, trying to speak the local language can make all the difference.” Download apps like Duolingo or Babbel to help.

Pack lightly and with good bags
Get your suitcases shipped to your new address, Baker says: “You’ll be figuring out a new public transportation system and being overloaded with luggage will make it harder.” Also, invest in a sturdy satchel that clips closed. “These are easier than rucksacks to keep an eye on when you’re on packed public transport,” Baker adds.

 Source:-theguardian

Studying abroad costs life savings – myths busted

There is no denying the strong parental instinct that drives us to provide the best possible start to the professional life of our children. Giving our child access to the amazing courses and programs of study available across the world for their
college education seems to be the best way to achieve it.

However, these things come at a cost. A foreign education can be incredibly taxing on a family’s savings. Many of the most popular educational institutions that Indian students flock to charge incredibly high fees for tuition to international students. Living expenses around these universities are also often very high, meaning that a middle-class family might have to pay substantially over Rs 1 crore to provide their child with this opportunity. At this price point, the education might come at the cost of the family’s financial health. Depleting your life’s savings for your children might seem noble, but there are other uses for that money that are just as important and noble.

However, this conundrum emerges from a series of myths that coerce families to make incredibly unfortunate choices about their finances with respect to studying abroad. There are a variety of options and alternatives that offer much better value for money while providing the quality education that your child needs for a bright future.

The most popular study-abroad destination for Indian students – colleges and universities in the USA – take on average Rs 88 lakh from international students pursuing a 4-year course. Adding the cost of accommodation, living expenses,living expenses, and supplies take the cost of that course up to an astronomical Rs 1.4 crore. For most middle-class Indian families, this is not an amount that can be paid for comfortably without making some major sacrifices.With so many students going for these courses and their parents left footing the bill, the impression has turned into a prevalent myth – that sending your child to study abroad will inescapably deplete your savings.

The reason that this is a myth is simple – there is no requirement for you to send your child specifically to the most expensive educational institutions in the world.

The most prominent universities in the UK and the US charge higher fees to their international students, and these funds are an important source of income for them.

While the quality of the education they provide is acknowledged to be outstanding, there are other institutions in the world that can offer comparable results at a lower price point than the Ivy League. Countries like Australia, Canada, and Japan house institutions that offer similar courses of study at a fraction of the cost, and are cheaper to live in.

Myth 2: The more expensive, the better the education

While there is no denying that the leading colleges and universities in the US offer an incredible educational experience, it wouldn’t be true to suggest that they have a monopoly on quality higher education. Varsities in other countries often have have a monopoly on quality higher education. Varsities in other countries often have great faculty, well-constructed and conceived curriculum, and are as highly ranked and appreciated as their US counterparts. In fact, in the prevailing difficulty in getting a work permit in either of those two countries. As such, you could be getting a much better opportunity for your child by considering these alternative options, which would be less taxing upon your savings.

Myth 3:

There’s no alternative source of funding While the number of these opportunities might be limited, most institutions offer scholarships and financial aid for students. These are provided on a need or merit basis, and if your child has a compelling application with good grades, they can even study with all the tuition being waived! Additionally, a wide network of philanthropic institutions like educational trusts, alumni networks, and even governments offer financial support in the form of grants, fee-waivers, or scholarships.

Another alternative is taking an education loan. Financial institutions and banks often provide education loans to students looking to study abroad on attractive terms, with a long repayment period and relatively low rates of interest. As a parent, you can act as a guarantor of the loan, and your child can start repaying it after they are done with their education and are gainfully employed. In this manner, you can safeguard your savings, provide your children with the education that they desire, and simultaneously inculcate a sense of responsibility in them.

Source:.deccanherald.cA

Haryana SSC Constable Recruitment 2018: Apply now for 7110 SI, Constable posts on hssc.gov.in

HSSC Recruitment 2018 for 7110 SI Constable posts; Image credits: hssc.gov.in

Haryana Staff Selection Commission, HSSC has invited applications for recruitment to 7110 Sub Inspector, SI Constable posts on its official website. Aspirants to take notice that the Haryana SSC Constable Recruitment 2018 notification has been re-advertised. For the first notification that was released in April, applications were invited until May 30, 2018. There are 6647 vacancies for the Constable positions, for both males and females, the remaining posts are for Sub inspector posts. Interested and eligible candidates can apply online for HSSC Recruitment 2018 at hssc.gov.in by July 2 using the direct link and steps given below.

The recruitment is currently live for the following five categories – Category 1 – Male Constable (General Duty), Category 2 – Female Constable (General Duty), Category 3 – India Reserve Battalions of Haryana State Male Constable (General Duty), Category 4 – Sub-Inspector (Male) and Category 5 – Sub-Inspector (Female). The facility to pay the application fee online would close on July 5.

Steps to apply online for HSSC Recruitment  2018:

Log on to hssc.gov.in using the direct link given here for your convenience. Read the official notification here.

Click on Click here for Advt. 3/2018. A new window would open. Click on Login or Register, if you’re a first-time candidate

Login/ Register successfully and proceed to the online application. Submit application successfully before July 2 and make the payment before July 7, 2018. Take a print out of the application for future reference.

[“source=cnbc”]

863 posts in Telangana degree colleges to have direct recruitment

863 posts in Telangana degree colleges to have direct recruitment

Under the Telangana Tribal Welfare Residential Educational Institutions Society (TTWREIS), the direct recruitment in various categories in degree colleges to 863 posts has been given approval by the state government on Wednesday.

The posts include 11 junior assistant/DEO posts, 15 posts each for principal, librarian, physical director, mess manager/warden, caretaker and storekeeper, 22 assistant librarian posts, 31 posts each for staff nurse and computer lab assistant, 62 lab assistant posts, and 616 lecturer posts.Telangana Residential Educational Institutions Recruitment Board (TREI-RB) will be recruiting directly and the Executive Office has been directed to take necessary measures in filling up the vacancies by acquiring the details including local cadres of the vacancies as per the Presidential Order,  qualification, roster points, etc from the authorities concerned and issue the recruitment notification accordingly.

The Tribal Welfare Department and the TTWREIS have also been instructed to furnish the details of all vacant posts to the recruiting agency under an intimation to the Finance department.

Source:-.thehansindia

Why you shouldn’t spend your whole time travelling when studying abroad

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If you’re studying abroad, it’s likely that you love the sweet taste of adventure. You’ve been bitten by the travel bug and want to venture to every town, city and country within a reasonable distance of your student dwellings.

But, while filling your weekends with travel might seem like the best idea, the reality is that it might not be so wise…

Studying abroad is a magical experience which is bound to go by in a flash so you’ll want to make the most of it. For some, this means packing up your suitcase and hopping on a plane at every opportunity you get.

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Travelling is often a wonderful, mind-opening experience, but be careful not to miss the action right in front of you. Source: Fancycrave/Unsplash

And while this is likely to be hugely rewarding, you might miss out on a few wonders back in your host country.

If your semester breaks and weekends are spent elsewhere you’ll miss out on all the fun happening right in front of you.

Instead, why not commit to a stay-cation? Go on ‘holiday’ in your host country, explore the city as a tourist, go to all the hidden places you don’t normally venture out to and treat yourself a little!

You just might discover things about the city you live in that you didn’t even know before.

You picked to study in that country for a reason, right? Maybe you loved the food or the weather, the people or the culture, perhaps it was the language or the academic reputation. Whatever it was that drew you there, there was a reason.

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You were excited when you moved there, right? So don’t go! Source: Giphy

Remind yourself of this and then make the most of it.

If you love the food, organise a food tour with some friends and travel around the city trying different delicacies. If it’s adventure you’re interested in, do some research and ask what exciting ventures are on offer for adrenaline-junkies or keen explorers. We bet there’s heaps to do!

And at the end of it all, you can go back to your student accommodation and relax for free, not to a shabby hostel you picked because it fit your student budget or a nice hotel that drained your bank balance.

While, if you have the money, travelling is a great way to spend your time and broaden your mind, you might want to look at all the wonders right in front of you before you board that plane.

Take it slow, soak up the culture, and enjoy the country you’re studying in. Remember the reason you chose it in the first place and appreciate it while you can. It’ll all be over before you know it and it will certainly be cheaper to buy a plane ticket than to invest in another degree abroad!

[“source=cnbc”]

Meet the new “Career of the Year” Barbie

Do the robot: These Barbies are ready to join the 21st century as robotics engineers, a new career for the Mattel doll.

The fantasy world of Barbie dolls just got more high-tech. On Tuesday, Mattel, the company that makes the famous stick figurine, announced Barbie’s new career: robotics engineer.

The “Career of the Year” Barbie is now available online for $13.99. She comes with safety goggles, a doll-sized laptop computer, and a small humanoid robot.

While robotics engineer is a first-ever career for Barbie, she’s previously had several occupations in science, technology, engineering, and math, including as a computer engineer, astronaut, and video game developer.

But this Barbie is more than just a doll, say STEM experts involved in its creation and launch.

“I’m excited because [the doll] allows our girls to imagine a future that I didn’t have at their age,” says Kimberly Bryant, an electrical engineer and founder of Black Girls Code, a nonprofit educational organization that’s received a grant from Barbie to help reach girls interested in the field. Some participants in the organization’s robotics workshops will receive the new Barbie doll.

Mattel will also offer seven free “Barbie-inspired” coding experiences through Tynker, an online platform that provides coding classes to children. The lessons will focus on logic, problem-solving, and other coding skills.

Bryant believes the robotics engineer Barbie, which comes in four skin tones, could help young girls imagine themselves in a STEM field at an early age. Women hold only 24 percentof STEM jobs in the United States, and Bryant says that lack of representation, both in pop culture and in the workplace, can deter women from entering and remaining in STEM careers.

Bryant’s favorite aspect of the doll is how her career represents the “intersection” of technology and engineering — in other words, coding a computer program and building a robot.

Barbie has an impressive resume. These are just a few of the STEM careers she's had over the years.

Barbie has an impressive resume. These are just a few of the STEM careers she’s had over the years.

IMAGE: MATTEL

Barbie enlisted Cynthia Breazeal, associate professor of media arts and sciences at MIT and founder of the social robot company Jibo, Inc., to ensure that the doll and her accessories accurately reflect the typical robotics engineer. The product packaging art depicts an industrial robot workspace, the robot looks similar to one you might find in hobbyist workshops, and the robot’s sprocket parts actually work.

Breazeal hopes the doll introduces girls to artificial intelligence and encourages them to learn more about robotics and engineering. Imaginative play with Barbie could include pretending to program a robot to do chores or homework.

“I think it opens up girls’ imaginations [to the idea] that intelligent machines can be in their daily lives,” says Breazeal.

That point isn’t a small one. With AI driving innovations in everyday products like phones, cars, and even doorbells, Breazeal says it’s imperative that the workforce behind those developments be as diverse as possible.

“When you talk about something like artificial intelligence, we cannot only have a few highly educated people” accessing and interacting with it, she says. “The democratization of these technologies is very, very important.”

Years from now, we’ll no doubt hear from pioneering female robotics engineers who fondly remember their “Career of the Year” doll.

source:-mashable

It’s not too late to think about a new career at 40

Childhood friends Kamal Karanth (left) and Anil Kumar Ethanur quit high paying jobs as managing directors of international staffing firms in their 40s to start their own venture. Photo: Ramegowda Bopaiah/Mint

In 2014, over a beer, childhood friends Kamal Karanth and Anil Kumar Ethanur decided to quit their high-paying jobs as managing directors of competing international staffing firms and start a business together. “We never imagined we would start our own company,” says 45-year-old Ethanur, “but I saw entrepreneurship as the ultimate challenge and wanted to give it a shot.” Karanth felt his career was stagnating and wanted to tap into the fast-growing staffing industry, pegged to grow to a $20 billion (around ₹1.3 trillion) market in India. “We weren’t making any difference to our clients beyond filling their recruitment needs,” says 46-year-old Karanth.

For a year before he took the plunge, he researched on the how-tos of starting a business and began to change his lifestyle. “I found a new job for my driver, moved my assistant off my work, sold my car, before I started Xpheno,” he says. In hindsight, this helped him adapt quicker to the life of an entrepreneur.

 People change careers for many reasons. It could be stagnation or sheer boredom, the absence of challenge. “Around midlife, you want to do something purposeful and understand who you really are,” says Prof. Srinivasan Tatachari, T A Pai Management Institute in Manipal. Prof. Tatachari switched tracks when he turned 40, opting for academics after working in the corporate world. “I had a well-paying job at Wipro when I quit to do my PhD, was already married, and had a small kid to take care of,” he says.

Other than financial constraints, he had to learn how to chart the world of academics. “I needed a lot of discipline and hard work to make it work,” he says, adding that his age actually helped him as he had both discipline and perseverance for research in greater degrees than those younger to him. “In academia, if you’ve had previous careers, students and colleagues look at you with respect, which is advantageous,” he says. However, he feels it’s important to keep at it and take adequate time to prepare for a career change.

Despite the challenges, late-life career changes often result in a positive emotional outlook, according to a study published in January in The International Journal Of Ageing And Human Development. Three important factors contribute to this. “If you have the financial resources, your family is supportive, and you wanted to change your career rather than ‘had to’, you will be in a positive state during the transition phase,” says Eric Vogelsang, assistant professor, sociology, at California State University, and the study researcher. It’s important to start saving money during your younger working years to prepare for possible career changes in future, no matter whether you want the change or are forced into it by a change in the economy.

Vijay Arisetty, 41, was forced to give up his career as a helicopter pilot with the Indian Air Force after a shoulder injury. In his early 30s at the time, Arisetty joined the Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, to learn the ropes of management. He worked with Goldman Sachs for four years, quitting in 2012 to start a cab aggregating company, PyngCabs; Arisetty shut it down the very next year as he could not scale operations. In 2014, the then 37-year-old started Kitchensfood, a home-cooked food delivery platform; it failed too. It was with his third start-up, myGate, a security app for apartment complexes launched in 2016, that Arisetty tasted success.

“My experiences in different careers have helped me look at a problem with different perspectives and come up with alternative solutions,” he says, adding that work values like willingness to learn, punctuality and teamwork have remained constants. “You’re never to old to start. Keep an open mind, be humble, ask for mentorship, and roll up your sleeves to understand the nuts and bolts of the new career, and you’ll succeed no matter what your age,” he says.

Karanth is glad he planned financially for three years so he could focus on the business. It has been 20 months since he left his job and he feels the hardest part is accepting that you’re a “nobody”. “It is a humbling experience. You have to be motivated, keep yourself fit as you’re not young any more, be organized, learn new technologies and unlearn to work with millennials with a no-frills, non-hierarchical mindset,” he says.

 The biggest challenge is finding your feet in the new career, says Prof. Neharika Vohra of the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, who has seen career-pivoting post 40 becoming more popular in India. “You’ve moved away from your comfort zone, you need to learn so many new things constantly, and it might involve a change in status and money,” she says, adding that family support and the requisite training help. Ethanur agrees. “Nothing can prepare you for this journey,” he says.

Even though investors are more welcoming of mid-career stage founders, and both he and Karanth have extensive networks in their industry, it’s the constant learning and need to be hands-on in a new business that he finds an uphill task. “What counts is your ability to learn new skills and pick up new habits,” he says. He also believes a good mentor, someone who is outside your friend and family circle, and with whom you can honestly share your struggles, is essential.

After quitting his job, Vijay Arisetty had to wait till his third venture to taste success. Photo: Ramegowda Bopaiah/Mint

After quitting his job, Vijay Arisetty had to wait till his third venture to taste success. Photo: Ramegowda Bopaiah/Mint

Managing a midlife crisis 

Prepare yourself. Gather the skills needed for the new job. Take courses, if required, or get a mentor. Accept that it will change your life drastically, that you’re stepping out of your comfort zone. If you’re not determined, you’ll quit at the first sign of trouble.

Plan the money. Make sure you have at least a few years of savings or investments to continue your current lifestyle, so you or people dependent on you don’t suffer too much when that regular salary stops.

Prepare your family. Ensure their lifestyle doesn’t change overnight. Bring them on board. That will save you emotional stress later on.

Roll up your sleeves. You might have been a managing director in your last career, but you need to learn the ropes of the new one. Keep your ego on the back-burner and be ready to listen to and learn from people half your age.

Unlearn and relearn. When you switch careers, it’s your ability to learn new skills and pick up new habits which become most important. Be open, humble and ready to pick up new things. Be a mentee till you adjust to your new role.

source:-livemint