Scaredy Bats: Australian public bash Aussie media for insulting Team India

India are bidding to win their first-ever Test series in Australia in the upcoming four-match rubber

ustralian media are at it again! Known for their aggressive and sometimes loathsome coverage of visiting cricketers, especially when it involves an away batsman at his peak, several newspapers Down Under have been successful in riling up opposition teams.

As it turns out, a leading news tabloid has called the Indian cricketers “The Scaredy Bats” upon their arrival in Adelaide for the first Test, starting December 6.

Australian journalist, Richard Hinds shared the photograph of the photo story that claims India have issues with the venues that are slated to host the much-anticipated four-Test series.

According to the report, India are “scared of the bounce” in Brisbane, “scared of the unknown” in Perth and “scared of the dark” in Adelaide, which comes as a sly dig at the visiting team’s reluctance to play day-night Test at the Adelaide Oval.

Even as the photograph of the tabloid clipping is going viral on social media, several cricket fans, including Australians, have lashed out at the reportage, calling it “childish” and “boorish tradition”.

[“source=indiatoday]

Schools can’t be substitute parents, Ofsted chief warns

Amanda Spielman
Amanda Spielman: schools ‘cannot be a panacea’ for all social ills. Photograph: Graeme Robertson/Guardian

Parents must not “abdicate their responsibility” by expecting schools to solve all the major problems children face, the chief inspector for schools will warn this week.

In a robust intervention attacking the increasing burdens placed on teachers, Ofsted chief Amanda Spielman will say schools “cannot be a panacea” for all social ills and will criticise some parents for neglecting some of the “most basic of parenting tasks”, such as toilet training.

While teachers “can play a role” in educating children about the dangers of knife crime and obesity, primary responsibility for these complex problems lies elsewhere, she will warn. When it comes to keeping to a healthy weight, she will say, “schools cannot take over the role of health professionals – and above all parents”.

In a speech marking the publication of her second annual Ofsted report, Spielman will say: “Our education and care services don’t exist in isolation from the local areas they serve. They are and should be a central part of our communities. But being part of a community means being very clear what your responsibilities are, and what issues, however worthy, can only be tackled beyond the school, college or nursery gates.”

Knife crime will be singled out as one of the most recent issues to place an additional burden on schools. “Most of our schools are safe, and we fully support measures, including zero-tolerance policies on the carrying of knives, to keep them that way,” Spielman will say. “But beyond that, while schools can play a role in educating young people about the danger of knives, they cannot be a panacea for this particular societal ill.

“Instead, preventing knife crime requires all local safeguarding partners to work together to protect children from harm while the relevant agencies tackle criminal activity and bring to justice youths and adults who cause harm to children.” Spielman said the obesity crisis was also “an issue which sits largely beyond the school gates”.

“Schools can and should teach children about the importance of healthy eating and exercise … their PE lessons should get them out of breath.

“But beyond that, schools cannot take over the role of health professionals – and above all parents. The answer to the obesity crisis, particularly among younger children, lies in the home, and parents should not abdicate their responsibility here.”

By the start of primary school, almost a quarter of children in England are overweight or obese, and the proportion rises to more than a third by the time they leave for secondary school. However, research by Ofsted has found no pattern to suggest that, on their own, interventions at school can be linked to a direct and measurable impact on weight.

Spielman will also chastise parents who allow their children to reach school without being toilet-trained. It comes amid growing evidence of children arriving at reception unable to use a toilet. “This is difficult for teachers, disruptive for other children and has a terrible social impact on the children affected,” she will say. “This is wrong. Toilet-training is the role of parents and carers, and should not be left to schools. Only in the most extreme cases should parents be excused from this most basic of parenting tasks.”

Spielman’s comments represent a blunt message to ministers keen to tackle topical issues by placing more responsibilities on schools even as they face cuts to resources in the face of austerity. Over the summer the Home Office issued lesson plans for children as young as 11 about the dangers of knife crime, which would involve them being told it is a “myth” that they will be safer with a weapon.

Plans were also announced to educate teachers on related slang.

Children’s minister Nadhim Zahawi said the lesson plans would “help illustrate the real impact of knife crime on young people’s lives” and that schools “up and down the country are taking advantage of them”. With evidence that the average age of knife crime victims is falling, some NHS doctors have called for school exit times to be staggered to reduce the chances of clashes.

There have been major concerns about teachers’ workloads and the impact on the numbers staying in the job. The Department for Education recently pledged to ease pressures on teachers in England after a report blamed an “audit culture” for causing stress among staff.

[“source=cnbc”]

Insurance on EMI: A proposal stuck at concept stage

WhatsApp Chief has written to the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), seeking a formal nod to expand payments services to all its 200 million users in India. The messaging app, which has drawn fire from the government over spread of fake messages on its platform, continues to wait for a regulatory clearance to launch full-fledged payments operations in India – months after its ‘testing’ amassed nearly one million users, and almost two years since it first began discussions with the government on its payments services plans.

The development comes at a time when competitors such as Google have forged ahead with their payments offerings.

WhatsApp is currently piloting WhatsApp payments, and its Chief Chris Daniels has now written to the RBI urging that a formal approval be granted to take the payments product to all its users in the country.

“I write to request your formal approval to immediately expand WhatsApp’s BHIM UPI (Unified Payments Interface) compliant payments product to all users in India, giving us the opportunity to offer a useful and secure service that can improve the lives of Indian people through digital empowerment and financial inclusion,” Daniels said in the letter addressed to the RBI Governor.

The letter, dated November 5, mentions that WhatsApp’s partner banks have also submitted a request for formal approval.

When contacted, a WhatsApp spokesperson said the platform is working closely with the Indian government, National Payments Corporation of India (NPCI), and multiple banks, including payment service providers to expand the feature to more people and support the country’s digital economy.

“Today, almost 1 million people are testing WhatsApp payments in India. The feedback has been very positive, and people enjoy the convenience of sending money as simply and securely as sending messages,” the company’s spokesperson said, responding to a specific email query on the recent plea to the RBI.

In the letter, WhatsApp noted that the platform had rushed to ensure that the payments data is stored in India, immediately after the RBI came out with a directive outlining the new payments data storage requirements in April this year.

“Today, (the) RBI has unfettered supervisory access to payments data as prescribed by the RBI circular…,” said the letter. PTI has seen a copy of the letter.

The Facebook-owned company has also demanded a “level playing field” for all companies that offer payment services, including “a certain and transparent regulatory and operating environment”.

WhatsApp has also made a case for scaling up its operations by citing the productivity gains that have accrued to Indian small business as a result of the digital tool, and expressed its deep commitment to the market.

“Based on feedback from NPCI and our bank partners, we are confident that we are fully compliant with the UPI checklist, have made all necessary submissions and have passed the security audits required to launch WhatsApp Payments,” Daniels said.

It could not be immediately ascertained if the firm has received any response from the RBI to its letter.

WhatsApp’s ambitious payment services’ blueprint has been caught in a bind, over concerns around authentication and its data storage practices. In the past, its home grown rivals have alleged that WhatsApp’s payment platform has security risks for consumers and is not in compliance with the guidelines.

WhatsApp has been under tremendous pressure to put in place a mechanism to curb fake news on its messaging platform that incited mob fury in India. Over a dozen people have been killed across the country this year in mob lynchings, fuelled by rumours circulating on WhatsApp.

The rumours ranged from suspicion of stealing children to victims being believed to be killing cows. Riots have been instigated by people forwarding and misinterpreting videos on WhatsApp.

The government has, on several occasions, warned the company that it can’t evade responsibility if its messaging service is used to spread false information. The Centre has directed WhatsApp to develop tools to combat fake or false messages, and, more importantly, to identify message originators.

Apart from the traceability request, the government had asked WhatsApp to set up a local corporate presence and appoint a grievance officer to address complaints.

[“source=designresearchcenter].

3 ways to get other people to pay off your student loans

 

3 ways to get other people to pay off your student loans

3 ways to get other people to pay off your student loans   10:50 AM ET Mon, 15 Oct 2018 | 01:23

This holiday season could be a good time to knock down your student debt.

Gift of College, an education registry, lets people register their student loan account, and then share their profile with friends and family who can contribute funds toward your loans.

“Wouldn’t you rather get Aunt Emma to kick in toward your student loans than give you another ugly sweater for Christmas?” said Nadine Perry, director of marketing at Gift of College.

If you’re doing gift swaps with your friends, you can even ask for a Gift of College gift card, which can be redeemed as a payment into any student loan account. (Here’s a directory of where the cards are sold).

As student debt grows, so do the plans to squelch it.

Some of the ideas are pretty creative: New Jersey, for example, considered establishing a lottery for borrowers burdened by student debt. Other ways of garnering money to eliminate your education debt don’t rely on luck, but rather require rolling up your sleeves or boning up on historical facts.

Keep in mind, however, that these endeavors aren’t free aid. The funds, even money offered by an organization in return for volunteer work, are taxable.

“All money you receive for volunteering or win on a trivia app or lottery is considered income by the IRS,” said Mark Kantrowitz, a student loan expert.

Here are some of the ways to get other people to pay off your debt.

1) At your job

Currently, just 4 percent of employers offer student debt assistance. But that’s changing as more employers come to realize education debt is a problem for many of their workers, said Katie Berliner, account executive at YouDecide, a benefits firm.

“In order to attract and retain talent, employers are looking at offering contributions to people’s student loans,” Berliner said.

Companies that have offered their employees help with their student loans include Aetna, Penguin Random House, Nvidia and Staples.

Fidelity announced this year that 25 employers — including Hewlett Packard Enterprise, New York Air Brake and Millennium Trust — plan to implement its student debt employer contribution program. (Fidelity also offers a student debt benefit for its own employees.)

“Do a quick Google search and find the employers who are out there doing this,” Berliner said.

Most likely, the company you’re interviewing with won’t offer the benefit, but that shouldn’t stop you from asking about it, Berliner said. “In the course of the interview, there comes a point where the interviewer says, ‘Do you have any questions?'” Berliner said. “It would not be out of line to say: ‘I want to get your perspective on whether you think this a valuable benefit.'”

2) By volunteering

Borrowers can enroll with Shared Harvest Fund. Users create a profile and list the social causes they’re interested in, such as gender equality or homelessness. You’ll work on projects for nonprofits and businesses and receive a monthly stipend of $250 to $1,000.

Although the work will start off in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York, “eventually, people can live in Arkansas and do work for a nonprofit in Los Angeles,” said NanaEfua B.A.M, founder of Shared Harvest Fund.

3) Apps/online

Givling is an app that lets student loan borrowers play trivia, with the winning team each week earning roughly $5,000 per person. “Some people are not the best trivia players, but they’re motivated to get help with their student loans,” said Seth Beard, Givling’s chief marketing officer.

The app ChangeEd will put your spare change toward your student loan payments. For example, if you buy a $1.75 coffee, 25 cents will go toward your debt.

[“source=ndtv”]

Maharashtra Approves 16 Per Cent Quota For Marathas In Education, Jobs

Maharashtra Assembly today unanimously passed a bill proposing 16 per cent reservation for Marathas under socially and educationally backward category.

Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis, who tabled the Bill, thanked Opposition members for helping in passage of the Bill unanimously.

The Bill provides for reservation of seats for admission in educational institutions and posts in public services to Marathas who have been declared as socially and educationally backward class of citizens.

Earlier, Mr Fadnavis also tabled the action taken report (ATR) on the State Backward Class Commission’s (SBCC) recommendations for reservation to the Maratha community in government jobs and education.

He also tabled the recommendations of the SBCC’s report on social, educational and financial status of the Maratha community.

Marathas have been declared as socially and educationally backward class of citizens (SEBC) and have inadequate representation in services under the state, the panel report said.

They are entitled to reservation benefits and advantages enshrined in the Articles 15(4) and 16(4) of the Constitution, it said.

The panel had suggested that looking at exceptional circumstances and extra-ordinary situations generated on declaring Marathas as socially and educationally backward and their consequential entitlement to reservation benefits, the government may take appropriate decision within constitutional provision to address the emerging scenario in the state.

The Bill to provide for reservation of seats for admission in educational institutions and posts in public services in the state was tabled thereafter.

[“source=forbes]

JIPMER MBBS Entrance 2018: Admit cards released, here’s how to download

The JIPMER admit card has candidate’s name, date of birth, photo, signature image and examination city allotted and roll number.

Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry (JIPMER) on Monday released the admit card or hall tickets of the entrance exam for admissions into its MBBS programme. The Common entrance test will be held on June 3 for selecting 200 candidates, out of which 150 will be admitted at the prestigious institute at Puducherry and 50 at the JIPMER, Karaikal.

Candidates can download their admit cards from the official website of the JIPMER by clicking here. Key in your user id and password to download the admit card. Take a printout of the hall ticket and save it on your computer too.

The admit card has candidate’s name, date of birth, photo, signature image and examination city allotted and roll number. Candidates must carry the admit card to the examination centre along with an Identity (ID) proof in original and a photocopy of the same.

Candidates are requested to reach the exam venue two hours before the commencement of the exam to avoid any last-minute hassles. They are also advised to visit the exam venue one day before the examination.

The morning shift exam will start at 10am and the entry to the center will close at 9:15am. The afternoon shift will start at 3pm and the entry to the center will close at 2.15pm.

The entrance test will be of two hours and thirty minutes duration. It will be conducted in online mode. There will be 200 objective type questions (MCOs) ( 60 each from physics, chemistry and biology and 10 each from English language and comprehension and logical and quantitative reasoning). Each correct answer will fetch 4 marks and for each wrong answer one marks will be deducted (negative marking). No marks will be deducted for unanswered questions.

The MBBS course at the JIPMER will be of four years and six months duration followed by one year of compulsory rotatory internship for getting the degree.

The result or merit list of the test is expected to be declared on or before June 20.

Note: Candidates should visit the official website of JIPMER regularly for latest updates and details.

Source:-.hindustantimes.

Missouri students may soon get option of free online courses

New legislation passed in Missouri means that as early as next year, public school students in kindergarten through 12th grade could have the option of taking online courses for free.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the Missouri House and Senate in May approved what’s been dubbed the Missouri Course Access and Virtual School Program. If Gov. Eric Greitens signs it, the law could become effective next summer.

The main intent is to expand course access for high school students in small, rural or financially-troubled schools that may not be able to afford teachers in advanced courses such as chemistry, Chinese or creative writing.

Under the new program, the school district or charter school would pick up the tab, not the student’s family.

“Having this course access kind of gets rid of the education by ZIP code and opens up a wide variety of classes for all the students,” said state Rep. Bryan Spencer, a Wentzville Republican and former teacher who led the proposal in the House.

Students could sidestep traditional schools completely, though a report last year raised concerns about the performance of full-time virtual students. The report by the National Education Policy Center found that only about 37 percent of full-time virtual schools in the U.S. received acceptable performance ratings, and the average graduation rate was 43 percent.

Susan Goldammer, associate executive director with the Missouri School Boards’ Association, cited concern that the program “will morph into virtual charter schools, where students aren’t students of the public school at all. Students can just enroll in it directly and the online provider will collect state aid.”

Missouri already has a statewide virtual school. The Missouri Virtual Instruction Program was established in 2007. But only “medically fragile” students and students who attend school in provisionally accredited or unaccredited districts can take MoVIP classes for free.

Because MoVIP is dependent on state funding, enrollment has been limited. Just 550 students from fewer than three dozen districts were enrolled in MoVIP in the recently-concluded school year.

Schools and the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education would be tasked with ensuring the quality of online classes. The state would publish an annual report showing student outcome data.A student’s request to enroll in the online school could be denied if doing so “is not in the best educational interest of the student.” Appeals would go to the local school board, then the state.

source:_ky3

3 Ways To Jumpstart Your Career This Summer

Summer is the prime time to get a jumpstart on your career. Work is slower and the days are longer, leaving you with more time to invest in yourself and your development. Whether you’re looking for a new job, working towards a promotion, or happy in your current role, you should always devote time to building your career.

Summer is usually a bit slower for most businesses, which means you have more time to build connections. Reach out to at least one person in your network that you haven’t been in contact with recently and set up a coffee meeting or phone call. Send a catch up email to someone from the last networking event you attended to touch base with them. You don’t always have to have a specific agenda to meet someone. It can be nice to just touch base and stay at the top of someone’s mind.

If you’re looking to change careers, reach out to someone at a company you’d like to work for. Learn about their role, their bosses, and what they like and don’t like about their job. If you’re working towards a promotion, find someone in the role you’re aspiring to. They don’t have to be at your company. Talk to them about how they got their job, and see if they have any recommendations for skills you should learn or ways to position yourself as the right candidate for that role.

In general, reach out to at least one new person every week. If you’re job searching, aim for connecting with five people each week. Remember that you won’t hear back from everyone. It’s not personal – perhaps they’re busy, the email you have isn’t one they use anymore or check often, or your message got lost in the sea of hundreds they receive daily. It’s always good to reach out twice. Wait about a week and then send another message with a friendly response checking to see if they received your previous email.

Learn a new skill.

A foolproof way to move your career forward is by learning. This can be done in a formal way by taking a class, or informally by studying on your own. Taking a group class or workshop is also another great way to expand your network and meet new people. What better time than the summer to learn something new? Take advantage of the slower pace of work and the days it’s too hot to go outside and fill them with something productive.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

How about a study-abroad adventure in Europe?

How about a study-abroad adventure in Europe?

Over the past few years, I have penned a number of articles examining schools outside Japan as possible destinations for higher education.

In my first piece, I presented the results of a survey of graduates matriculating to overseas universities from high schools across Japan, giving particular attention to the costs involved. In a following article, I used a recent study by a Stanford University student to examine why students considering overseas study often decide to stay in Japan instead.

I then conducted a critical review of the Yanai Tadashi scholarship, a grand source of funding made available only to those matriculating to America’s most selective schools. And afterward, I responded to a reader’s suggestion to examine Canada as a possible destination for higher education.

Shortly afterward, I was contacted by Gavin Williams, Kumon Kokusai Gakuen‘s overseas university counselor, who kindly shared his thoughts about a number of “good value” schools in continental Europe offering programs in English, posing the question, “Why not Europe?”

A continent of pros and cons

Before we take a closer look at a handful of universities, let’s skip to the all-important bottom line: The annual cost for each of the four schools featured below is similar to the cost for international students matriculating to Canada, yet somewhat lower than the sticker prices at many U.S. universities. (For the details, see the bottom of each section.)

However, one key factor should be considered: Most students complete degree programs at these European schools in three years — i.e., one year less than is common in Canada and the U.S. — so the total cost of undergraduate programs at these European schools could end up being significantly less.

Now, what are the concerns that a student should consider before selecting these European schools as possible destinations?

First, you need to have a fairly good idea of where your passion lies and the field of study you intend to pursue. If you are looking for a liberal arts experience that will allow you a few years to explore a wide variety of interests in various fields of study, or an open curriculum like that found at Brown University permitting you to craft your own major, the European schools below may not be for you.

Second, because English-taught degrees are relatively new throughout much of Europe, there are not many senpai (seniors) to provide advice, guidance and assistance. You will most likely end up being the future senpai for others. If requested, many of these universities will make an attempt to put you in touch with Japanese graduates, though, but those will often be graduates from master’s programs.

Third, life at these schools often requires use of a third language — e.g., when out on the town in Milan or Madrid. Some might welcome this adventure and the prospect of acquiring another language or two; others may shy away from the added dissonance.

One issue that we have not addressed in any of the previous articles concerns job prospects in the country of study after graduation. If you graduate from a U.S. university and desire to work in the U.S., for example, getting a visa to do so for more than a year can be challenging unless you have STEM (science, technology, engineering or math) expertise or you marry a U.S. national. Canada is more welcoming. In fact, according to Statistics Canada, 32 percent of international students starting bachelor’s degrees in Canada become permanent residents within 10 years of entering university.

Veronica Sullo of Milan-based Bocconi University was quick to point out that work visas for non-EU/EEA nationals from Bocconi should not be a problem in the business sector, but she added, “The majority of international or multinational companies located in Italy may require candidates to be fluent in Italian in order to be hired permanently.”

The Careers Department at Madrid’s IE University offered the following: “After completing their studies, there are various ways how non-EU graduates could stay in Spain, should they wish to. Options include applying for a high-skilled qualified visa (open to students graduating from top schools, such as IE).”

Non-EU/EEA nationals matriculating from German universities are eligible for residence permits that allow them to reside in the country for 18 months while seeking employment. And once a job contract is secured, those individuals become eligible for an EU Blue Card, which enables the holder to live and work anywhere in the EU.

International graduates of Dutch universities can similarly apply for an “orientation year” that will allow them to stay in the Netherlands and look for a job for up to a year from the date of graduation. And if a job is found and salary benchmarks met, a Dutch work visa can be acquired. A year later, an application for an EU Blue Card can be submitted.

For the family of today, university education is often something of a business choice in which costs are weighed against benefits. And with a confluence of quality, cultural diversity and value, Europe might be the right decision for some Japanese students.

And we haven’t even mentioned lifestyle. On that note, Risa Hasegawa, a University of Tokyo undergraduate currently doing a year at Leiden University in the Netherlands as an exchange student, had this to say:

“Life here is relaxing and enjoyable. People don’t focus too much on work; they do what they have to do and, after that, people enjoy their life. They spend their free time with people they love or doing things they like to do. It could be traveling, camping, drinking on a boat, reading a book or just lying in the grass on a sunny day. I learned what it means to live happily in Europe.”

With a little imagination and planning, this could be you. Why not indeed.

Award winner: Bocconi University
Award winner: Bocconi University’s faculty building in Milan was named World Building of the Year at the inaugural World Architecture Festival in 2008. | COURTESY OF BOCCONI UNIVERSITY

Bocconi University

For students looking to pursue careers in economics, management or finance, Williams recommends Bocconi University in Milan, a renowned business school where undergraduate programs can generally can be completed in three years. For those desiring an additional year of study, Bocconi also offers a new and very alluring four-year World Bachelor in Business degree. In this program, students spend their first year at the University of Southern California, their second at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, their third at Bocconi and their fourth at a partner school of their choice — completing their studies with experience on three continents and perhaps command of several languages to boot.

“We are looking for responsible, independent students who are ready to leave their comfort zone,” Veronica Sullo of Bocconi’s Recruitment Office says. “Bocconi students like to be challenged, to learn and interact with different cultures.”

The bachelor of science degrees in business and management are of particular note, and the QS University Rankings of this area of study regularly include Bocconi in the top 10 worldwide. Bocconi also offers exchange and double-degree programs with 270 universities worldwide, including Waseda and Keio. And 85 percent of Bocconi students pursue a master’s degree immediately after graduating, often moving on to other schools in Europe, such as the London Business School.

Bocconi University, Milan: 14,000 students; 7,600 undergraduates; 38 percent of students in classes taught in English are international; estimated annual cost €25,358 (¥3.3 million) Admissions: SAT (over 1270 (suggested)), ACT (over 30) or Bocconi’s own test delivered in Milan and Shanghai at fixed dates three times a year; IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 89

IE University

IE University began operating in 2009, building on the success of one of Europe’s top business schools. IE has two campuses — one in the historic city of Segovia, a UNESCO World Heritage site 25 minutes from Madrid, and the other in the heart of Madrid’s business district. The school also has a very diverse student population, and the campus is growing. In fact, an impressive 35-story rectangular tower is set to open in 2020 and add to IE’s technology-based, sustainable urban campus model. Williams would recommend IE to students seeking a broader spectrum of career options, including business administration, international relations, architectural studies and law (with both European and U.S. tracks).

Kaoru Inoue, director of IE’s Tokyo office, says, “We are looking for open-minded Japanese students who are willing to learn from one another, dare to be different, and embrace change as a form of growth and innovation to make the world and society a better place.”

With a focus on diversity, innovation and interaction, her message for Japanese students is: “Learning from international faculty and working on a lot of practical group projects with your classmates from all over the world will enable you to be ready to start a career, doing what you really love, no matter where it is on the globe.”

IE University, Madrid: 2,900 students (67 percent of which are international); estimated annual cost €35,504 (¥4.6 million) Admissions: SAT (minimum 1,200), ACT (min. 24), LNAT (min. 22) or IE University admissions test at local office in Tokyo; Skype interview; no TOEFL

Dutch master
Dutch master’s?: The historic rooms and facades of Leiden University’s prestigious Academy Building have been restored to their pre-1878 state featuring a palette of Old Dutch colors. | COURTESY OF LEIDEN UNIVERSITY

Leiden University

For an even wider range of options, students might look farther north to Leiden in Holland. Founded in 1575 by William of Silent, the Prince of Orange, Leiden is the oldest university in the Netherlands. The school offers 12 English-taught bachelor’s programs — including political science, South and Southeast Asian studies, linguistics and Dutch studies — and also has an exciting liberal arts and sciences program at The Hague, proudly known as the international city of peace and justice. In fact, in the Times Higher Education 2018 rankings, Leiden was ranked 25th worldwide in the field of arts and humanities.

The Times ranking puts Leiden’s international student percentage at 12 percent, but according to Carolyn Barr, the school’s international relations officer, the range of overseas students in the English-taught bachelor’s programs generally falls between 30 and 80 percent. She also notes that the majority of students choose to pursue a master’s program, some staying on at Leiden and others moving elsewhere. Of Japanese candidates, she says, “We are looking for motivated, academically excellent students who value making and sharing their own opinions, doing research and contributing to the international flavor of Leiden University.”

Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands: 28,000 students (of which 12 percent are international); estimated annual cost: €22,600 (¥2.9 million) Admissions: Varies according to high school diploma (e.g., IB, etc.), but good GPA generally required; TOEFL iBT 90, IELTS 6.5 or Cambridge CAE grade C

Carl Benz School at the KIT

Located in the south of Germany within a lively science, research and high-tech hub, the Carl Benz School at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology would be perfect for a future mechanical engineer with excellent high school grades in math and physics. The three-year program includes a 12-week industrial internship — possibly at nearby Daimler, Siemens or Bosch — and often leads to careers in design, production, logistics and product management.

In fact, the specialized nature of the courses on offer, the reputation of the school and its strong industry network position KIT as a leader in graduate employability (ranked No. 30 worldwide in the 2018 QS University Rankings). Williams mentioned that a number of Kumon Kokusai graduates have attended KIT and gone on to careers in traditional engineering and IT.

Carl Benz School at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany: Up to 150 students (90 percent international); estimated annual cost €23,055 (¥3 million) Admissions: TOEIC 880 or TOEFL iBT 88, new SAT 1,200

Other options

There are plenty of opportunities in other areas, and many colleges afford a unique entry point to their corresponding professional spheres.

The six-year International Medical Doctor Program at Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Italy has been designed “to foster a new kind of doctor” and could lead to a career in medicine without the eye-watering costs often involved.

Ecole hoteliere de Lausanne is a hospitality management school in Switzerland and stands among the best in the world, with alumni dignifying five-star hotels and resorts in every corner of the globe.

source:-japantimes

Want your child to study abroad? Here are the best cities for international students

1. London | Highest-ranked institution: UCL (University College London) | Population: 13,880,000 | Average international fees: $21,200 | Employer Activity rank: 2 (Image: Reuters)

1. London | Highest-ranked institution: UCL (University College London) | Population: 13,880,000 | Average international fees: $21,200 | Employer Activity rank: 2 (Image: Reuters)

2. Tokyo | Highest-ranked institution: University of Tokyo | Population: 37,800,000 | Average international fees: $6,700 | Employer Activity rank: 1 (Image: Reuters)

2/10

2. Tokyo | Highest-ranked institution: University of Tokyo | Population: 37,800,000 | Average international fees: $6,700 | Employer Activity rank: 1 (Image: Reuters)

3. Melbourne | Highest-ranked institution: University of Melbourne | Population: 4,530,000 | Average international fees: $23,300 | Employer Activity rank: 10 (Image: Reuters)

3/10

3. Melbourne | Highest-ranked institution: University of Melbourne | Population: 4,530,000 | Average international fees: $23,300 | Employer Activity rank: 10 (Image: Reuters)

4. Montréal | Highest-ranked institution: McGill University | Population: 4,127,000 | Average international fees: $13,200 | Employer Activity rank: 20 (Image: Reuters)

4/10

4. Montréal | Highest-ranked institution: McGill University | Population: 4,127,000 | Average international fees: $13,200 | Employer Activity rank: 20 (Image: Reuters)

5. Paris | Highest-ranked institution: ENS Paris | Population: 12,405,000 | Average international fees: $3,400 | Employer Activity rank: 7 (Image: Reuters)

5/10

5. Paris | Highest-ranked institution: ENS Paris | Population: 12,405,000 | Average international fees: $3,400 | Employer Activity rank: 7 (Image: Reuters)

6. Munich | Highest-ranked institution: Technische Universität München | Population: 2,600,000 | Average international fees: $100 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

6/10

6. Munich | Highest-ranked institution: Technische Universität München | Population: 2,600,000 | Average international fees: $100 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

7. Berlin | Highest-ranked institution: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Population: 6,005,000 | Average international fees: $2000 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

7/10

7. Berlin | Highest-ranked institution: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Population: 6,005,000 | Average international fees: $2000 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

8. Zurich | Highest-ranked institution: ETH Zurich | Population: 1,900,000 | Average international fees: $1,900 | Employer Activity rank: 6 (Image: Reuters)

8/10

8. Zurich | Highest-ranked institution: ETH Zurich | Population: 1,900,000 | Average international fees: $1,900 | Employer Activity rank: 6 (Image: Reuters)

9. Sydney | Highest-ranked institution: The University of New South Wales | Population: 4,921,000 | Average international fees: $26,400 | Employer Activity rank: 13 (Image: Reuters)

9/10

9. Sydney | Highest-ranked institution: The University of New South Wales | Population: 4,921,000 | Average international fees: $26,400 | Employer Activity rank: 13 (Image: Reuters)

10. Seoul | Highest-ranked institution: Seoul National University (SNU) | Population: 25,000,000 | Average international fees: $6,500 | Employer Activity rank: 4 (Image: Reuters)

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10. Seoul | Highest-ranked institution: Seoul National University (SNU) | Population: 25,000,000 | Average international fees: $6,500 | Employer Activity rank: 4 (Image: Reuters)

source:-moneycontl