Prof Mushirul Hasan’s Demise Has Created A Great Void: AMU Vice Chancellor

Prof Mushirul Hasan has done extensive work on partition and on the history of Islam in South-Asia.

Prof Mushirul Hasan's Demise Has Created A Great Void: AMU Vice Chancellor

Aligarh: The demise of distinguished historian, Professor Mushirul Hasan has saddened the entire fraternity of the Aligarh Muslim University, his alma-matter. Prof Hasan was an alumnus of the University whose academic accomplishments made AMU proud of, said a statement from the varsity. He did his schooling from the AMU’s STS High School (Minto Circle); obtained BA (History Honours) and MA from the Department of History, AMU.

After teaching history in a college in Delhi, he left for the Cambridge and earned his PhD from there.

His PhD thesis on nationalism and communal politics in India during 1885-1930 broke a ground, when it was published, and ran into many editions. Later, his meticulously well-researched works on India’s partition got wide scale citations by the scholars across the globe.

Expressing his grief on the loss of an illustrious alumnus, Prof Tariq Mansoor, the AMU Vice Chancellor, said that his death has created a great void in the world of scholarship on Modern and contemporary Indian History.

Prof Hasan has done extensive work on the Partition of India and on the history of Islam in South-Asia.

In 2002, Prof Hasan was elected as the President of Indian History Congress. He also served as the Director-General of the National Archives of India.

Prof Hasan was admitted to the hospital on Sunday night. He breathed his last at 4 am on Monday.

“He met with a road accident about two years ago and was mostly bed-ridden after that. He was also undergoing dialysis for kidney problems,” former secretary to Jamia Vice chancellor, Zafar Nawaz Hashmi, said.

Most distinguished of Prof Hasan’s long research essays were on: Muslim Mass Contact Campaign of the 1930s; Nationalist Trends in Aligarh; his book (1997) on India’s Muslims since Independence, and on, Pluralism in Awadh, got wider appreciation.

[“source=”patch”]

Insurance on EMI: A proposal stuck at concept stage

WhatsApp Chief has written to the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), seeking a formal nod to expand payments services to all its 200 million users in India. The messaging app, which has drawn fire from the government over spread of fake messages on its platform, continues to wait for a regulatory clearance to launch full-fledged payments operations in India – months after its ‘testing’ amassed nearly one million users, and almost two years since it first began discussions with the government on its payments services plans.

The development comes at a time when competitors such as Google have forged ahead with their payments offerings.

WhatsApp is currently piloting WhatsApp payments, and its Chief Chris Daniels has now written to the RBI urging that a formal approval be granted to take the payments product to all its users in the country.

“I write to request your formal approval to immediately expand WhatsApp’s BHIM UPI (Unified Payments Interface) compliant payments product to all users in India, giving us the opportunity to offer a useful and secure service that can improve the lives of Indian people through digital empowerment and financial inclusion,” Daniels said in the letter addressed to the RBI Governor.

The letter, dated November 5, mentions that WhatsApp’s partner banks have also submitted a request for formal approval.

When contacted, a WhatsApp spokesperson said the platform is working closely with the Indian government, National Payments Corporation of India (NPCI), and multiple banks, including payment service providers to expand the feature to more people and support the country’s digital economy.

“Today, almost 1 million people are testing WhatsApp payments in India. The feedback has been very positive, and people enjoy the convenience of sending money as simply and securely as sending messages,” the company’s spokesperson said, responding to a specific email query on the recent plea to the RBI.

In the letter, WhatsApp noted that the platform had rushed to ensure that the payments data is stored in India, immediately after the RBI came out with a directive outlining the new payments data storage requirements in April this year.

“Today, (the) RBI has unfettered supervisory access to payments data as prescribed by the RBI circular…,” said the letter. PTI has seen a copy of the letter.

The Facebook-owned company has also demanded a “level playing field” for all companies that offer payment services, including “a certain and transparent regulatory and operating environment”.

WhatsApp has also made a case for scaling up its operations by citing the productivity gains that have accrued to Indian small business as a result of the digital tool, and expressed its deep commitment to the market.

“Based on feedback from NPCI and our bank partners, we are confident that we are fully compliant with the UPI checklist, have made all necessary submissions and have passed the security audits required to launch WhatsApp Payments,” Daniels said.

It could not be immediately ascertained if the firm has received any response from the RBI to its letter.

WhatsApp’s ambitious payment services’ blueprint has been caught in a bind, over concerns around authentication and its data storage practices. In the past, its home grown rivals have alleged that WhatsApp’s payment platform has security risks for consumers and is not in compliance with the guidelines.

WhatsApp has been under tremendous pressure to put in place a mechanism to curb fake news on its messaging platform that incited mob fury in India. Over a dozen people have been killed across the country this year in mob lynchings, fuelled by rumours circulating on WhatsApp.

The rumours ranged from suspicion of stealing children to victims being believed to be killing cows. Riots have been instigated by people forwarding and misinterpreting videos on WhatsApp.

The government has, on several occasions, warned the company that it can’t evade responsibility if its messaging service is used to spread false information. The Centre has directed WhatsApp to develop tools to combat fake or false messages, and, more importantly, to identify message originators.

Apart from the traceability request, the government had asked WhatsApp to set up a local corporate presence and appoint a grievance officer to address complaints.

[“source=designresearchcenter].

How about a study-abroad adventure in Europe?

How about a study-abroad adventure in Europe?

Over the past few years, I have penned a number of articles examining schools outside Japan as possible destinations for higher education.

In my first piece, I presented the results of a survey of graduates matriculating to overseas universities from high schools across Japan, giving particular attention to the costs involved. In a following article, I used a recent study by a Stanford University student to examine why students considering overseas study often decide to stay in Japan instead.

I then conducted a critical review of the Yanai Tadashi scholarship, a grand source of funding made available only to those matriculating to America’s most selective schools. And afterward, I responded to a reader’s suggestion to examine Canada as a possible destination for higher education.

Shortly afterward, I was contacted by Gavin Williams, Kumon Kokusai Gakuen‘s overseas university counselor, who kindly shared his thoughts about a number of “good value” schools in continental Europe offering programs in English, posing the question, “Why not Europe?”

A continent of pros and cons

Before we take a closer look at a handful of universities, let’s skip to the all-important bottom line: The annual cost for each of the four schools featured below is similar to the cost for international students matriculating to Canada, yet somewhat lower than the sticker prices at many U.S. universities. (For the details, see the bottom of each section.)

However, one key factor should be considered: Most students complete degree programs at these European schools in three years — i.e., one year less than is common in Canada and the U.S. — so the total cost of undergraduate programs at these European schools could end up being significantly less.

Now, what are the concerns that a student should consider before selecting these European schools as possible destinations?

First, you need to have a fairly good idea of where your passion lies and the field of study you intend to pursue. If you are looking for a liberal arts experience that will allow you a few years to explore a wide variety of interests in various fields of study, or an open curriculum like that found at Brown University permitting you to craft your own major, the European schools below may not be for you.

Second, because English-taught degrees are relatively new throughout much of Europe, there are not many senpai (seniors) to provide advice, guidance and assistance. You will most likely end up being the future senpai for others. If requested, many of these universities will make an attempt to put you in touch with Japanese graduates, though, but those will often be graduates from master’s programs.

Third, life at these schools often requires use of a third language — e.g., when out on the town in Milan or Madrid. Some might welcome this adventure and the prospect of acquiring another language or two; others may shy away from the added dissonance.

One issue that we have not addressed in any of the previous articles concerns job prospects in the country of study after graduation. If you graduate from a U.S. university and desire to work in the U.S., for example, getting a visa to do so for more than a year can be challenging unless you have STEM (science, technology, engineering or math) expertise or you marry a U.S. national. Canada is more welcoming. In fact, according to Statistics Canada, 32 percent of international students starting bachelor’s degrees in Canada become permanent residents within 10 years of entering university.

Veronica Sullo of Milan-based Bocconi University was quick to point out that work visas for non-EU/EEA nationals from Bocconi should not be a problem in the business sector, but she added, “The majority of international or multinational companies located in Italy may require candidates to be fluent in Italian in order to be hired permanently.”

The Careers Department at Madrid’s IE University offered the following: “After completing their studies, there are various ways how non-EU graduates could stay in Spain, should they wish to. Options include applying for a high-skilled qualified visa (open to students graduating from top schools, such as IE).”

Non-EU/EEA nationals matriculating from German universities are eligible for residence permits that allow them to reside in the country for 18 months while seeking employment. And once a job contract is secured, those individuals become eligible for an EU Blue Card, which enables the holder to live and work anywhere in the EU.

International graduates of Dutch universities can similarly apply for an “orientation year” that will allow them to stay in the Netherlands and look for a job for up to a year from the date of graduation. And if a job is found and salary benchmarks met, a Dutch work visa can be acquired. A year later, an application for an EU Blue Card can be submitted.

For the family of today, university education is often something of a business choice in which costs are weighed against benefits. And with a confluence of quality, cultural diversity and value, Europe might be the right decision for some Japanese students.

And we haven’t even mentioned lifestyle. On that note, Risa Hasegawa, a University of Tokyo undergraduate currently doing a year at Leiden University in the Netherlands as an exchange student, had this to say:

“Life here is relaxing and enjoyable. People don’t focus too much on work; they do what they have to do and, after that, people enjoy their life. They spend their free time with people they love or doing things they like to do. It could be traveling, camping, drinking on a boat, reading a book or just lying in the grass on a sunny day. I learned what it means to live happily in Europe.”

With a little imagination and planning, this could be you. Why not indeed.

Award winner: Bocconi University
Award winner: Bocconi University’s faculty building in Milan was named World Building of the Year at the inaugural World Architecture Festival in 2008. | COURTESY OF BOCCONI UNIVERSITY

Bocconi University

For students looking to pursue careers in economics, management or finance, Williams recommends Bocconi University in Milan, a renowned business school where undergraduate programs can generally can be completed in three years. For those desiring an additional year of study, Bocconi also offers a new and very alluring four-year World Bachelor in Business degree. In this program, students spend their first year at the University of Southern California, their second at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, their third at Bocconi and their fourth at a partner school of their choice — completing their studies with experience on three continents and perhaps command of several languages to boot.

“We are looking for responsible, independent students who are ready to leave their comfort zone,” Veronica Sullo of Bocconi’s Recruitment Office says. “Bocconi students like to be challenged, to learn and interact with different cultures.”

The bachelor of science degrees in business and management are of particular note, and the QS University Rankings of this area of study regularly include Bocconi in the top 10 worldwide. Bocconi also offers exchange and double-degree programs with 270 universities worldwide, including Waseda and Keio. And 85 percent of Bocconi students pursue a master’s degree immediately after graduating, often moving on to other schools in Europe, such as the London Business School.

Bocconi University, Milan: 14,000 students; 7,600 undergraduates; 38 percent of students in classes taught in English are international; estimated annual cost €25,358 (¥3.3 million) Admissions: SAT (over 1270 (suggested)), ACT (over 30) or Bocconi’s own test delivered in Milan and Shanghai at fixed dates three times a year; IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 89

IE University

IE University began operating in 2009, building on the success of one of Europe’s top business schools. IE has two campuses — one in the historic city of Segovia, a UNESCO World Heritage site 25 minutes from Madrid, and the other in the heart of Madrid’s business district. The school also has a very diverse student population, and the campus is growing. In fact, an impressive 35-story rectangular tower is set to open in 2020 and add to IE’s technology-based, sustainable urban campus model. Williams would recommend IE to students seeking a broader spectrum of career options, including business administration, international relations, architectural studies and law (with both European and U.S. tracks).

Kaoru Inoue, director of IE’s Tokyo office, says, “We are looking for open-minded Japanese students who are willing to learn from one another, dare to be different, and embrace change as a form of growth and innovation to make the world and society a better place.”

With a focus on diversity, innovation and interaction, her message for Japanese students is: “Learning from international faculty and working on a lot of practical group projects with your classmates from all over the world will enable you to be ready to start a career, doing what you really love, no matter where it is on the globe.”

IE University, Madrid: 2,900 students (67 percent of which are international); estimated annual cost €35,504 (¥4.6 million) Admissions: SAT (minimum 1,200), ACT (min. 24), LNAT (min. 22) or IE University admissions test at local office in Tokyo; Skype interview; no TOEFL

Dutch master
Dutch master’s?: The historic rooms and facades of Leiden University’s prestigious Academy Building have been restored to their pre-1878 state featuring a palette of Old Dutch colors. | COURTESY OF LEIDEN UNIVERSITY

Leiden University

For an even wider range of options, students might look farther north to Leiden in Holland. Founded in 1575 by William of Silent, the Prince of Orange, Leiden is the oldest university in the Netherlands. The school offers 12 English-taught bachelor’s programs — including political science, South and Southeast Asian studies, linguistics and Dutch studies — and also has an exciting liberal arts and sciences program at The Hague, proudly known as the international city of peace and justice. In fact, in the Times Higher Education 2018 rankings, Leiden was ranked 25th worldwide in the field of arts and humanities.

The Times ranking puts Leiden’s international student percentage at 12 percent, but according to Carolyn Barr, the school’s international relations officer, the range of overseas students in the English-taught bachelor’s programs generally falls between 30 and 80 percent. She also notes that the majority of students choose to pursue a master’s program, some staying on at Leiden and others moving elsewhere. Of Japanese candidates, she says, “We are looking for motivated, academically excellent students who value making and sharing their own opinions, doing research and contributing to the international flavor of Leiden University.”

Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands: 28,000 students (of which 12 percent are international); estimated annual cost: €22,600 (¥2.9 million) Admissions: Varies according to high school diploma (e.g., IB, etc.), but good GPA generally required; TOEFL iBT 90, IELTS 6.5 or Cambridge CAE grade C

Carl Benz School at the KIT

Located in the south of Germany within a lively science, research and high-tech hub, the Carl Benz School at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology would be perfect for a future mechanical engineer with excellent high school grades in math and physics. The three-year program includes a 12-week industrial internship — possibly at nearby Daimler, Siemens or Bosch — and often leads to careers in design, production, logistics and product management.

In fact, the specialized nature of the courses on offer, the reputation of the school and its strong industry network position KIT as a leader in graduate employability (ranked No. 30 worldwide in the 2018 QS University Rankings). Williams mentioned that a number of Kumon Kokusai graduates have attended KIT and gone on to careers in traditional engineering and IT.

Carl Benz School at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany: Up to 150 students (90 percent international); estimated annual cost €23,055 (¥3 million) Admissions: TOEIC 880 or TOEFL iBT 88, new SAT 1,200

Other options

There are plenty of opportunities in other areas, and many colleges afford a unique entry point to their corresponding professional spheres.

The six-year International Medical Doctor Program at Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Italy has been designed “to foster a new kind of doctor” and could lead to a career in medicine without the eye-watering costs often involved.

Ecole hoteliere de Lausanne is a hospitality management school in Switzerland and stands among the best in the world, with alumni dignifying five-star hotels and resorts in every corner of the globe.

source:-japantimes

Working with drones: Still not a career for most?

Karan Kamdar, president, Indian Drone Racing League, hopes the government will relax norms; and Bhavesh Sangani (below) sees drone flying only as a part-time job. Photo: Aniruddha Chowdhury/Mint

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While studying at an engineering college in Tumkur, Karnataka, in 2009, Bhavesh Sangani bought a small toy: a remote-controlled helicopter. Before he started flying it, he tied it with a thread, just like a kite, scared it might land somewhere else. Something worse happened—the flight crashed and the toy was wrecked. What remained with Sangani, however, was the desire to fly something with a remote control. The same year, he started a club in college that made DIY remote-controlled flights or drones. “By the time I graduated in 2011, we had built 36 remote-controlled electrical planes, all self-taught through the internet,” says the 28-year-old. The hobby helped Sangani land a job as an engineer with Quest Global, an engineering services company based in Bengaluru, straight out of college.

It has been nine years since Sangani picked up drone-flying as a hobby. In this time, he has seen it evolve from a geeky pastime to a fledgling, yet promising, career option that is in demand in several sectors—from movie shoots and public sector undertakings to mining companies and survey agencies.

Bhavesh Sangani with his drones. Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint

“Since I have a lot of experience flying these birds, I can easily choose to become a full-time test pilot for new products for mapping or surveying in a few years. There is a lot of scope for future growth of this technology,” says Sangani.

Globally, the market for piloted drones is forecast to more than double by 2022, according to a European Commission impact assessment report released in December 2015. The report estimates some 150,000 jobs by 2050 in Europe alone. According to an estimate last year by the non-profit body, Consortium of Unmanned Vehicle Systems India (Cuvsi), there are 40,000 drones in the Indian sky and Indians have spent more than Rs40 crore buying civil drones, even though their civilian use is illegal.

Karan Kamdar, 33, president of the Indian Drone Racing League (IDRL), which organizes drone-racing events in colleges, moved from the US to India in 2014 to explore a start-up experimenting in drone photography, DIY drone kits and robotics. When the Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar approached him in 2016 to conduct a First Person View (FPV) drone race (in which a pilot can view video feed from a camera attached to a drone through a headset or goggles) on its campus, he knew this would be big. “When this offer came to us, there was just a small group of Bengaluru hobbyists who did FPV racing. I decided to put up a website to request for teams,” he says. Within 24 hours, Kamdar and his team had hundreds of inquiries. The Gandhinagar event was India’s first competitive drone race; it was won by Sangani.

Soon, Kamdar started getting inquiries from institutes, drone pilots and students who wanted to make their own drones, and teams and individuals interested in participating in the races. “Since the first league, I haven’t had time,” he says. “We’ve conducted 17 events across the country in one and a half years, have grown to a community of 800 pro pilots who are training others on how to build and fly their own quads or drones, have a dedicated team of designers who create challenging tracks for their pro pilots, and have even held a night race. And this is just racing drones that I’m talking about.” Kamdar has also launched a marketplace for drone spare parts, runs workshops on drone-making and piloting, and is the go-between for projects and corporate events for the pro pilots in his community. Kamdar charges Rs15,000 for hosting an IDRL event, on top of actual cost. Most pilots work part-time since it’s a niche career. “Our pilots have a career in aerial photography, mining industry, testing for drone start-ups and many other undeveloped fields,” says Kamdar, adding that he hopes the government will relax its policies so that the hobby can become a lucrative career.

In October 2014, the directorate general of civil aviation (DGCA) imposed a blanket ban on all civil operations of drones in the Indian airspace, with permission possible on a case-by-case basis. “If I’m shooting a film and need government permission for drone flying, the law says that I have to get the permission for that day and time I plan to fly 90 days in advance. What if the weather that day doesn’t permit me to fly?” asks Raisin George, a documentary maker and digital communications professional at a Bengaluru-based start-up who has been practising drone flying since March 2016.

Using his DJI Phantom 4 drone, the 31-year-old has made films on treks in the Himalayas, of a few monuments outside Bengaluru, and beaches like Kaup in Karnataka’s Udupi district. He even managed to convince the Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC)—after chasing them for six months—to make a documentary on Bengaluru buses. In March, the documentaryWhat Bengalureans Think About BMTC Buses won an honourable jury mention award at the Indian World Film Festival in Hyderabad. Now George regularly gets inquiries from prospective clients for aerial photography and videography, but the moment he tells them about the permissions required from DGCA, they say, “Okay, some other day.”

[“Source-timesofindia”]

South Suburban woman’s student loans snowball when lenders transfer loans without notice

Image result for South Suburban woman's student loans snowball when lenders transfer loans without notice

A south suburban woman is demanding answers from the Department of Education after her son’s student loans were transferred to different companies and snowballed out of control. She said she wasn’t getting the bills.

“I will be forever on the hamster wheel,” Sharon Mack said of paying off the loans.

Mack took out approximately $24,000 worth of loans for her son in 2009. Now the Palos Hills woman owes the Department of Education almost $38,000.

“Because all of the loans were being bought and sold by different lenders, I didn’t receive anything in the mail saying it was now bought and transferred,” she said.

Mack says she didn’t know the loans were transferred three times and that she didn’t receive bills. That’s when they snowballed with interest and late fees. When she defaulted, the loans transferred from the private servicer to a debt collector and then back to the Department of Education.

“They put me in default status, income tax check comes around and they seize the second check so then I call them and I say I am making my payments you are taking it out of my checking account every month,” Mack said.

Mack wants the Department of Education to put her in good standing and stop seizing her federal income tax checks. She provided the I-Team documentation showing monthly payments to the Department of Education, she says since April 2016.

“It’s taken a toll on us, we just want it to be fair and honest,” she said.

The Illinois Attorney General’s Office said it’s working with Mack to get answers from the federal agency. The office is also working with the last lender and the collection agency to help get Mack get back into good standing, since she now has a history of payments.

“I would not ruin my credit over a student loan. This has plummeted my credit,” Mack said.

The Department of Education said it’s looking into the I-Team’s questions about Mack’s case but had not responded to the I-Team as of Friday evening.

It’s legal for lenders to transfer student loans, but they must alert consumers if the servicer changes. Under a new state law written by the Illinois attorney general, they will have to alert consumers 15 days before the transfer instead of 45 days after.

“Not everyone has a college fund, you want your kids to go to college and have a good education and have a good life and you take out a loan and without your knowledge it keeps being bought and sold by different lenders,” Mack said.

Borrowers also have a responsibility to inquire if they’re strangely not seeing bills or debits from a lender.

That loan is not going to disappear – it’s most likely been transferred or sold.

Also, Illinois law says that student loan lenders must offer a lower payment option to borrowers in financial trouble.

Source:-abc7chicago.

Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compare

Image result for Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compareLawyer Rohan Mahajan got an unexpected call a few years back. Nirbhaya’s parents were calling for help when the case reached the Supreme Court. Mahajan brought in senior counsels to help on a pro bono basis (free of cost). “Everyone is helpless when it comes to legal support. While financial success is not guaranteed, you get the opportunity to help people and do something right,” said Mahajan.

This is only one of the reasons why law is an evergreen career opt

Suppose you buy the principle from my previous article that you need to own your career. You understand that you live in an innovation-driven economy, your learning must keep pace and employability is your responsibility. How, then, can you apply the principle of career ownership to yourself?

Career ownership is a natural extension of living in a democratic society, and exercising choice. Moreover, your career is not a physical artifact, like a dining table, that can stay in the same condition for a lifetime. Your career is always in a state of flux: shaping, and being shaped by, the outside environment. Here are some questions you can ask to test where you stand right now.

Where can you go? This first question calls for you to look beyond what’s familiar. What is the wider market for the work you can do, and the further learning that you seek? Do you have the skills to do something different? What do you know about employers that may value your talents? Are there opportunities for you to work in virtual space, from your own home? Whom can you talk to in order to find out more information? Are there part-time, or contract work or volunteer opportunities that can help you go in a new direction?

Who’s supporting you? Owning your career ought not to be a solitary activity. On the contrary, having friends, family, colleagues, and mentors who support you is an essential part of career ownership. Within this overall group you can identify a smaller group, an imaginary “board of directors” that you hold in high regard. What does your imaginary board look like? What kind of board vacancy would you like to fill? You can expect fluidity among your supporters, including adding new ones in return for favors you did them. In this way, effective “give and take” can play an important part in developing your support system over time.

Where’s your reputation? This question differs from the previous one. Its focus is on the people—bosses, customers, project team members, occupational peers and so on—who have directly experienced your work and respect what you can do. Over time, you can expect your reputation to become scattered across a wider area. Moreover, you don’t need to move to grow your reputation. That can happen through other people moving, and taking your reputation to new places. Many career moves stem from an unanticipated phone call from a former co-worker who knows your worth.

Who’s your agent? You will be familiar with the idea of an agent from the worlds of professional sports, or movie-making or the theater. You may not think you need any equivalent in your own career. However, it’s important to see that your agent may not be an individual person, but a function performed by a range of people. It’s common for bosses, co-workers, headhunters, and contractors from the past to want to work with you again. It’s useful to map out who those people are, and to keep in touch so that they stand ready to help again as your career moves forward.

What’s the next step? The most important point here is that you take a next step, and in turn another, and another. You may be under a lot of pressure to deliver results in your present job, or have little free time, or have family obligations that restrict what you’d really like to do. However, to practice career ownership you owe it to yourself to do something, however small a step that may be. That something can lead to a fresh round of experimentation that leads in turn to a new door of opportunity.sking where can you go, who’s supporting you, where’s your reputation, who’s your agent and what’s the next step can make you a more informed contributor to a democratic society. They can also take you a long way toward owning your career.

Source:-.forbes

ion. It has a certain degree of prestige attached to it. Whether it is Ram Jethmalani and Mukul Rohatgi who have taken it up as a profession or the likes of P Chidambaram and Arun Jaitley who are lawyers by qualification, they are all well known.

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Besides, the country is always pressed for those with knowledge of legal matters. “As people become more educated and aware of the law, we find the number of court cases increasing, which means that there is great demand for lawyers. In a country which has a population of 1.3 billion, the number of lawyers is a minuscule 1 million. India needs more lawyers to cater to this burgeoning population,” said Ashwin Madhavan,founder, Enhelion, a legal education company.

Law offers a variety of sub-specialities that one can choose from. For those interested in the corporate and business aspects, there is corporate law. For those intrigued by crime, there is criminal law. Today, several niche areas have arisen from traditional practices such as civil or criminal litigation. For instance, one can specialise in laws related to media and entertainment. Rising awareness of environmental issues such as the use of clean technology, renewable energy, managing carbon assets and keeping greenhouse gas inventories has created work for environmental law attorneys, adds Mahajan. Taxation and banking remain areas that corporates are always looking for professional help on and a specialisation in this area could be useful.

Experts in the space add that these labels can be convenient but the work involves understanding the core tenets. For instance, specialising in sports law or entertainment law also involves looking at these areas through the realm of commerce or commercial law.

Being a lawyer is also about being multi-skilled. Madhavan of Enhelion says effective oral communication, strong research and analytical skills along with good interpersonal skills and the ability to understand and listen to the client are all crucial skills to have.

Once one becomes a lawyer, there are multiple avenues to look at. “As a lawyer, you have the option to set up your law firm to learn the ropes, become a part of the judiciary, or enjoy the thrills of a corporate practice by being an in-house counsel to a multi-national company,” says Mahajan.

Many young lawyers with an entrepreneurial streak set up their own practice early in their career. For instance, Mahajan has set up LawRato.com as an online legal marketplace.One can also choose to specialise in a particular area or focus on a select set of areas. Rodney D Ryder, founding partner of Scriboard Advocates and Legal Consultants dons many hats. From managing the complete trademark portfolio for cricketer MS Dhoni and some teams, he also works in the area of information technology and Intellectual Property. Ryder also works with startups as they develop their ideas and products by helping them protect their ideas from being infringed upon. “There are always new and interesting areas to be explored. For instance, today the interface being technology or internet and law is an exciting new path. With all the discussion on data privacy, this is an offbeat track to look at,” said Ryder.
Other than these regular career paths, lawyers are also holding influential positions in the government sectors to work as policy makers for affecting a national/global change, adds Mahajan.

Being a lawyer gives you an opportunity to do some good while you work. For instance, Mahajan’s LawRato.com offers free legal aid for certain people such as victims of crime, war heroes and war widows.

While early years can be a struggle financially, as one moves up the ladder, the profession can be very lucrative. Senior counsels who are consulted by top business honchos and politicians are known charge several lakhs for an hour of their time.

source:-timesofindia.indiatimes

Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compare

Image result for Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compare

Lawyer Rohan Mahajan got an unexpected call a few years back. Nirbhaya’s parents were calling for help when the case reached the Supreme Court. Mahajan brought in senior counsels to help on a pro bono basis (free of cost). “Everyone is helpless when it comes to legal support. While financial success is not guaranteed, you get the opportunity to help people and do something right,” said Mahajan.

This is only one of the reasons why law is an evergreen career opt

Suppose you buy the principle from my previous article that you need to own your career. You understand that you live in an innovation-driven economy, your learning must keep pace and employability is your responsibility. How, then, can you apply the principle of career ownership to yourself?

Career ownership is a natural extension of living in a democratic society, and exercising choice. Moreover, your career is not a physical artifact, like a dining table, that can stay in the same condition for a lifetime. Your career is always in a state of flux: shaping, and being shaped by, the outside environment. Here are some questions you can ask to test where you stand right now.

Where can you go? This first question calls for you to look beyond what’s familiar. What is the wider market for the work you can do, and the further learning that you seek? Do you have the skills to do something different? What do you know about employers that may value your talents? Are there opportunities for you to work in virtual space, from your own home? Whom can you talk to in order to find out more information? Are there part-time, or contract work or volunteer opportunities that can help you go in a new direction?

Who’s supporting you? Owning your career ought not to be a solitary activity. On the contrary, having friends, family, colleagues, and mentors who support you is an essential part of career ownership. Within this overall group you can identify a smaller group, an imaginary “board of directors” that you hold in high regard. What does your imaginary board look like? What kind of board vacancy would you like to fill? You can expect fluidity among your supporters, including adding new ones in return for favors you did them. In this way, effective “give and take” can play an important part in developing your support system over time.

Where’s your reputation? This question differs from the previous one. Its focus is on the people—bosses, customers, project team members, occupational peers and so on—who have directly experienced your work and respect what you can do. Over time, you can expect your reputation to become scattered across a wider area. Moreover, you don’t need to move to grow your reputation. That can happen through other people moving, and taking your reputation to new places. Many career moves stem from an unanticipated phone call from a former co-worker who knows your worth.

Who’s your agent? You will be familiar with the idea of an agent from the worlds of professional sports, or movie-making or the theater. You may not think you need any equivalent in your own career. However, it’s important to see that your agent may not be an individual person, but a function performed by a range of people. It’s common for bosses, co-workers, headhunters, and contractors from the past to want to work with you again. It’s useful to map out who those people are, and to keep in touch so that they stand ready to help again as your career moves forward.

What’s the next step? The most important point here is that you take a next step, and in turn another, and another. You may be under a lot of pressure to deliver results in your present job, or have little free time, or have family obligations that restrict what you’d really like to do. However, to practice career ownership you owe it to yourself to do something, however small a step that may be. That something can lead to a fresh round of experimentation that leads in turn to a new door of opportunity.sking where can you go, who’s supporting you, where’s your reputation, who’s your agent and what’s the next step can make you a more informed contributor to a democratic society. They can also take you a long way toward owning your career.

Source:-.forbes

ion. It has a certain degree of prestige attached to it. Whether it is Ram Jethmalani and Mukul Rohatgi who have taken it up as a profession or the likes of P Chidambaram and Arun Jaitley who are lawyers by qualification, they are all well known.

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Besides, the country is always pressed for those with knowledge of legal matters. “As people become more educated and aware of the law, we find the number of court cases increasing, which means that there is great demand for lawyers. In a country which has a population of 1.3 billion, the number of lawyers is a minuscule 1 million. India needs more lawyers to cater to this burgeoning population,” said Ashwin Madhavan,founder, Enhelion, a legal education company.

Law offers a variety of sub-specialities that one can choose from. For those interested in the corporate and business aspects, there is corporate law. For those intrigued by crime, there is criminal law. Today, several niche areas have arisen from traditional practices such as civil or criminal litigation. For instance, one can specialise in laws related to media and entertainment. Rising awareness of environmental issues such as the use of clean technology, renewable energy, managing carbon assets and keeping greenhouse gas inventories has created work for environmental law attorneys, adds Mahajan. Taxation and banking remain areas that corporates are always looking for professional help on and a specialisation in this area could be useful.

Experts in the space add that these labels can be convenient but the work involves understanding the core tenets. For instance, specialising in sports law or entertainment law also involves looking at these areas through the realm of commerce or commercial law.

Being a lawyer is also about being multi-skilled. Madhavan of Enhelion says effective oral communication, strong research and analytical skills along with good interpersonal skills and the ability to understand and listen to the client are all crucial skills to have.

Once one becomes a lawyer, there are multiple avenues to look at. “As a lawyer, you have the option to set up your law firm to learn the ropes, become a part of the judiciary, or enjoy the thrills of a corporate practice by being an in-house counsel to a multi-national company,” says Mahajan.

Many young lawyers with an entrepreneurial streak set up their own practice early in their career. For instance, Mahajan has set up LawRato.com as an online legal marketplace.One can also choose to specialise in a particular area or focus on a select set of areas. Rodney D Ryder, founding partner of Scriboard Advocates and Legal Consultants dons many hats. From managing the complete trademark portfolio for cricketer MS Dhoni and some teams, he also works in the area of information technology and Intellectual Property. Ryder also works with startups as they develop their ideas and products by helping them protect their ideas from being infringed upon. “There are always new and interesting areas to be explored. For instance, today the interface being technology or internet and law is an exciting new path. With all the discussion on data privacy, this is an offbeat track to look at,” said Ryder.
Other than these regular career paths, lawyers are also holding influential positions in the government sectors to work as policy makers for affecting a national/global change, adds Mahajan.

Being a lawyer gives you an opportunity to do some good while you work. For instance, Mahajan’s LawRato.com offers free legal aid for certain people such as victims of crime, war heroes and war widows.

While early years can be a struggle financially, as one moves up the ladder, the profession can be very lucrative. Senior counsels who are consulted by top business honchos and politicians are known charge several lakhs for an hour of their time.

source:-timesofindia.indiatimes

It’s not too late to think about a new career at 40

Childhood friends Kamal Karanth (left) and Anil Kumar Ethanur quit high paying jobs as managing directors of international staffing firms in their 40s to start their own venture. Photo: Ramegowda Bopaiah/Mint

In 2014, over a beer, childhood friends Kamal Karanth and Anil Kumar Ethanur decided to quit their high-paying jobs as managing directors of competing international staffing firms and start a business together. “We never imagined we would start our own company,” says 45-year-old Ethanur, “but I saw entrepreneurship as the ultimate challenge and wanted to give it a shot.” Karanth felt his career was stagnating and wanted to tap into the fast-growing staffing industry, pegged to grow to a $20 billion (around ₹1.3 trillion) market in India. “We weren’t making any difference to our clients beyond filling their recruitment needs,” says 46-year-old Karanth.

For a year before he took the plunge, he researched on the how-tos of starting a business and began to change his lifestyle. “I found a new job for my driver, moved my assistant off my work, sold my car, before I started Xpheno,” he says. In hindsight, this helped him adapt quicker to the life of an entrepreneur.

 People change careers for many reasons. It could be stagnation or sheer boredom, the absence of challenge. “Around midlife, you want to do something purposeful and understand who you really are,” says Prof. Srinivasan Tatachari, T A Pai Management Institute in Manipal. Prof. Tatachari switched tracks when he turned 40, opting for academics after working in the corporate world. “I had a well-paying job at Wipro when I quit to do my PhD, was already married, and had a small kid to take care of,” he says.

Other than financial constraints, he had to learn how to chart the world of academics. “I needed a lot of discipline and hard work to make it work,” he says, adding that his age actually helped him as he had both discipline and perseverance for research in greater degrees than those younger to him. “In academia, if you’ve had previous careers, students and colleagues look at you with respect, which is advantageous,” he says. However, he feels it’s important to keep at it and take adequate time to prepare for a career change.

Despite the challenges, late-life career changes often result in a positive emotional outlook, according to a study published in January in The International Journal Of Ageing And Human Development. Three important factors contribute to this. “If you have the financial resources, your family is supportive, and you wanted to change your career rather than ‘had to’, you will be in a positive state during the transition phase,” says Eric Vogelsang, assistant professor, sociology, at California State University, and the study researcher. It’s important to start saving money during your younger working years to prepare for possible career changes in future, no matter whether you want the change or are forced into it by a change in the economy.

Vijay Arisetty, 41, was forced to give up his career as a helicopter pilot with the Indian Air Force after a shoulder injury. In his early 30s at the time, Arisetty joined the Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, to learn the ropes of management. He worked with Goldman Sachs for four years, quitting in 2012 to start a cab aggregating company, PyngCabs; Arisetty shut it down the very next year as he could not scale operations. In 2014, the then 37-year-old started Kitchensfood, a home-cooked food delivery platform; it failed too. It was with his third start-up, myGate, a security app for apartment complexes launched in 2016, that Arisetty tasted success.

“My experiences in different careers have helped me look at a problem with different perspectives and come up with alternative solutions,” he says, adding that work values like willingness to learn, punctuality and teamwork have remained constants. “You’re never to old to start. Keep an open mind, be humble, ask for mentorship, and roll up your sleeves to understand the nuts and bolts of the new career, and you’ll succeed no matter what your age,” he says.

Karanth is glad he planned financially for three years so he could focus on the business. It has been 20 months since he left his job and he feels the hardest part is accepting that you’re a “nobody”. “It is a humbling experience. You have to be motivated, keep yourself fit as you’re not young any more, be organized, learn new technologies and unlearn to work with millennials with a no-frills, non-hierarchical mindset,” he says.

 The biggest challenge is finding your feet in the new career, says Prof. Neharika Vohra of the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, who has seen career-pivoting post 40 becoming more popular in India. “You’ve moved away from your comfort zone, you need to learn so many new things constantly, and it might involve a change in status and money,” she says, adding that family support and the requisite training help. Ethanur agrees. “Nothing can prepare you for this journey,” he says.

Even though investors are more welcoming of mid-career stage founders, and both he and Karanth have extensive networks in their industry, it’s the constant learning and need to be hands-on in a new business that he finds an uphill task. “What counts is your ability to learn new skills and pick up new habits,” he says. He also believes a good mentor, someone who is outside your friend and family circle, and with whom you can honestly share your struggles, is essential.

After quitting his job, Vijay Arisetty had to wait till his third venture to taste success. Photo: Ramegowda Bopaiah/Mint

After quitting his job, Vijay Arisetty had to wait till his third venture to taste success. Photo: Ramegowda Bopaiah/Mint

Managing a midlife crisis 

Prepare yourself. Gather the skills needed for the new job. Take courses, if required, or get a mentor. Accept that it will change your life drastically, that you’re stepping out of your comfort zone. If you’re not determined, you’ll quit at the first sign of trouble.

Plan the money. Make sure you have at least a few years of savings or investments to continue your current lifestyle, so you or people dependent on you don’t suffer too much when that regular salary stops.

Prepare your family. Ensure their lifestyle doesn’t change overnight. Bring them on board. That will save you emotional stress later on.

Roll up your sleeves. You might have been a managing director in your last career, but you need to learn the ropes of the new one. Keep your ego on the back-burner and be ready to listen to and learn from people half your age.

Unlearn and relearn. When you switch careers, it’s your ability to learn new skills and pick up new habits which become most important. Be open, humble and ready to pick up new things. Be a mentee till you adjust to your new role.

source:-livemint

Education loans: What is a moratorium period and what makes is so useful?

Image result for Education,loans:,What,is,a,moratorium,period,and,what,makes,is,so,useful?

With rising competition, it’s easier and cheaper to get an education loan today than it was a few years back. But for a university or country that is not popular among students, a lender may seek additional security.

When taking a loan, it is important to look at various factors, and not just the interest rate. . To arrive at your loan requirement, consider charges like hostel, university mess, other incidental expenses, besides tuition fees Lenders may not lend for admission in less-popular universities or ask for extra collateral as the non-performing assets .

source:-business-standard.

Your guide to becoming a DevOps engineer starts with these six online courses

Take these six courses and you'll be on your way to becoming a DevOps engineer.

The DevOps approach has helped businesses all over the world speed up their development processes, deploy more frequently, and ensure a high standard of quality with every release. In other words? Be more successful.

In fact, businesses that hire for DevOps skills can often see a boost in deployment frequency and fewer failures. Despite this tremendous boon, the companies that have DevOps engineers on staff are still in the minority. While that’s bad news for them, it might be good news for you if you’re considering a career in this booming field. The demand is high. The competition is low. It’s time to take the leap.

To get you started, we’ve laid out six crucial DevOps competencies — first defined by The New Stack — that you’ll need to get your foot in the door. And once you know your trajectory, you can start training towards it with the Pay What You Want DevOps Bundle, $834 worth of online instruction for the price of your choosing. Here are the skills:

1. Collaboration

DevOps was born out of the historically terrible working relationships between development and IT operations teams. But DevOps practitioners consider it crucial to collaborate with not just IT, but multiple teams across an organization, from QA teams to business teams. If you want to make a dent in a company’s productivity as a DevOps engineer, you best learn to tear down the silos and make inroads all across the office.

2. Automation

A crucial part of the DevOps ethos is simplifying and streamlining the end-to-end development process with the help of automation. Two of the most commonly used DevOps tools for aiding automation are Docker and Jenkins, so be sure to bone up on both in preparation for your DevOps job hunt.

3. Continuous integration

The larger a dev team grows, the more likely it is that defects will be introduced into a large code base, and the harder it becomes to identify and fix those mistakes. Continuous integration solves for that by creating a “security checkpoint” wherein any change must undergo immediate testing and reporting, every time. If you want to “integrate” with your new DevOps teammates, you should get used to providing thorough documentation and rapid feedback on any contribution, and familiarize yourself with the tools used to build continuous integration pipelines (like the aforementioned Jenkins).

4. Continuous testing

Remember when we mentioned collaboration with QA teams was a tenet of DevOps? Continuous testing is why. Thorough testing can’t be done in a vacuum. More errors can be caught early when developers double-check their own code before sending to QA, provide test data sets, and help to configure testing environments. Because of this, successful DevOps engineers must be meticulous and willing to offer assistance to test engineers whenever possible.

5. Continuous delivery

Due to the continuous integration and testing practices inherent in a DevOps workflow, all code should be in a consistently deployable state during any given step of the process. This vastly reduces the complexity of an individual release and thus allows much higher release frequency. In other words, a steady stream of reliable, iterative updates, instead of one unwieldy update that’s only been tested on the way out the door. The practice of continuous delivery calls for engineers who can move quickly and finish what they start without sacrificing accuracy.

6. Continuous monitoring

Even though DevOps enhances overall quality and lowers the rate of release failure, nobody is perfect. Glitches are inevitable — the process actually counts on it. Continuous monitoring aims to find and fix errors in real time. Once the underlying cause of an error is understood, that information can be used to monitor development and other steps in the process, filtering out errors long before they can make it to production. A savvy DevOps engineer should always be ready to correct mistakes and know how to spot them in all other stages as well.

If you think you’ve got what it takes to put this DevOps theory into practice, grab the Pay What You Want DevOps Bundle now.

 source:-mashable