3 Ways To Jumpstart Your Career This Summer

Summer is the prime time to get a jumpstart on your career. Work is slower and the days are longer, leaving you with more time to invest in yourself and your development. Whether you’re looking for a new job, working towards a promotion, or happy in your current role, you should always devote time to building your career.

Summer is usually a bit slower for most businesses, which means you have more time to build connections. Reach out to at least one person in your network that you haven’t been in contact with recently and set up a coffee meeting or phone call. Send a catch up email to someone from the last networking event you attended to touch base with them. You don’t always have to have a specific agenda to meet someone. It can be nice to just touch base and stay at the top of someone’s mind.

If you’re looking to change careers, reach out to someone at a company you’d like to work for. Learn about their role, their bosses, and what they like and don’t like about their job. If you’re working towards a promotion, find someone in the role you’re aspiring to. They don’t have to be at your company. Talk to them about how they got their job, and see if they have any recommendations for skills you should learn or ways to position yourself as the right candidate for that role.

In general, reach out to at least one new person every week. If you’re job searching, aim for connecting with five people each week. Remember that you won’t hear back from everyone. It’s not personal – perhaps they’re busy, the email you have isn’t one they use anymore or check often, or your message got lost in the sea of hundreds they receive daily. It’s always good to reach out twice. Wait about a week and then send another message with a friendly response checking to see if they received your previous email.

Learn a new skill.

A foolproof way to move your career forward is by learning. This can be done in a formal way by taking a class, or informally by studying on your own. Taking a group class or workshop is also another great way to expand your network and meet new people. What better time than the summer to learn something new? Take advantage of the slower pace of work and the days it’s too hot to go outside and fill them with something productive.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

Working with drones: Still not a career for most?

Karan Kamdar, president, Indian Drone Racing League, hopes the government will relax norms; and Bhavesh Sangani (below) sees drone flying only as a part-time job. Photo: Aniruddha Chowdhury/Mint

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While studying at an engineering college in Tumkur, Karnataka, in 2009, Bhavesh Sangani bought a small toy: a remote-controlled helicopter. Before he started flying it, he tied it with a thread, just like a kite, scared it might land somewhere else. Something worse happened—the flight crashed and the toy was wrecked. What remained with Sangani, however, was the desire to fly something with a remote control. The same year, he started a club in college that made DIY remote-controlled flights or drones. “By the time I graduated in 2011, we had built 36 remote-controlled electrical planes, all self-taught through the internet,” says the 28-year-old. The hobby helped Sangani land a job as an engineer with Quest Global, an engineering services company based in Bengaluru, straight out of college.

It has been nine years since Sangani picked up drone-flying as a hobby. In this time, he has seen it evolve from a geeky pastime to a fledgling, yet promising, career option that is in demand in several sectors—from movie shoots and public sector undertakings to mining companies and survey agencies.

Bhavesh Sangani with his drones. Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint

“Since I have a lot of experience flying these birds, I can easily choose to become a full-time test pilot for new products for mapping or surveying in a few years. There is a lot of scope for future growth of this technology,” says Sangani.

Globally, the market for piloted drones is forecast to more than double by 2022, according to a European Commission impact assessment report released in December 2015. The report estimates some 150,000 jobs by 2050 in Europe alone. According to an estimate last year by the non-profit body, Consortium of Unmanned Vehicle Systems India (Cuvsi), there are 40,000 drones in the Indian sky and Indians have spent more than Rs40 crore buying civil drones, even though their civilian use is illegal.

Karan Kamdar, 33, president of the Indian Drone Racing League (IDRL), which organizes drone-racing events in colleges, moved from the US to India in 2014 to explore a start-up experimenting in drone photography, DIY drone kits and robotics. When the Indian Institute of Technology, Gandhinagar approached him in 2016 to conduct a First Person View (FPV) drone race (in which a pilot can view video feed from a camera attached to a drone through a headset or goggles) on its campus, he knew this would be big. “When this offer came to us, there was just a small group of Bengaluru hobbyists who did FPV racing. I decided to put up a website to request for teams,” he says. Within 24 hours, Kamdar and his team had hundreds of inquiries. The Gandhinagar event was India’s first competitive drone race; it was won by Sangani.

Soon, Kamdar started getting inquiries from institutes, drone pilots and students who wanted to make their own drones, and teams and individuals interested in participating in the races. “Since the first league, I haven’t had time,” he says. “We’ve conducted 17 events across the country in one and a half years, have grown to a community of 800 pro pilots who are training others on how to build and fly their own quads or drones, have a dedicated team of designers who create challenging tracks for their pro pilots, and have even held a night race. And this is just racing drones that I’m talking about.” Kamdar has also launched a marketplace for drone spare parts, runs workshops on drone-making and piloting, and is the go-between for projects and corporate events for the pro pilots in his community. Kamdar charges Rs15,000 for hosting an IDRL event, on top of actual cost. Most pilots work part-time since it’s a niche career. “Our pilots have a career in aerial photography, mining industry, testing for drone start-ups and many other undeveloped fields,” says Kamdar, adding that he hopes the government will relax its policies so that the hobby can become a lucrative career.

In October 2014, the directorate general of civil aviation (DGCA) imposed a blanket ban on all civil operations of drones in the Indian airspace, with permission possible on a case-by-case basis. “If I’m shooting a film and need government permission for drone flying, the law says that I have to get the permission for that day and time I plan to fly 90 days in advance. What if the weather that day doesn’t permit me to fly?” asks Raisin George, a documentary maker and digital communications professional at a Bengaluru-based start-up who has been practising drone flying since March 2016.

Using his DJI Phantom 4 drone, the 31-year-old has made films on treks in the Himalayas, of a few monuments outside Bengaluru, and beaches like Kaup in Karnataka’s Udupi district. He even managed to convince the Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC)—after chasing them for six months—to make a documentary on Bengaluru buses. In March, the documentaryWhat Bengalureans Think About BMTC Buses won an honourable jury mention award at the Indian World Film Festival in Hyderabad. Now George regularly gets inquiries from prospective clients for aerial photography and videography, but the moment he tells them about the permissions required from DGCA, they say, “Okay, some other day.”

[“Source-timesofindia”]

South Suburban woman’s student loans snowball when lenders transfer loans without notice

Image result for South Suburban woman's student loans snowball when lenders transfer loans without notice

A south suburban woman is demanding answers from the Department of Education after her son’s student loans were transferred to different companies and snowballed out of control. She said she wasn’t getting the bills.

“I will be forever on the hamster wheel,” Sharon Mack said of paying off the loans.

Mack took out approximately $24,000 worth of loans for her son in 2009. Now the Palos Hills woman owes the Department of Education almost $38,000.

“Because all of the loans were being bought and sold by different lenders, I didn’t receive anything in the mail saying it was now bought and transferred,” she said.

Mack says she didn’t know the loans were transferred three times and that she didn’t receive bills. That’s when they snowballed with interest and late fees. When she defaulted, the loans transferred from the private servicer to a debt collector and then back to the Department of Education.

“They put me in default status, income tax check comes around and they seize the second check so then I call them and I say I am making my payments you are taking it out of my checking account every month,” Mack said.

Mack wants the Department of Education to put her in good standing and stop seizing her federal income tax checks. She provided the I-Team documentation showing monthly payments to the Department of Education, she says since April 2016.

“It’s taken a toll on us, we just want it to be fair and honest,” she said.

The Illinois Attorney General’s Office said it’s working with Mack to get answers from the federal agency. The office is also working with the last lender and the collection agency to help get Mack get back into good standing, since she now has a history of payments.

“I would not ruin my credit over a student loan. This has plummeted my credit,” Mack said.

The Department of Education said it’s looking into the I-Team’s questions about Mack’s case but had not responded to the I-Team as of Friday evening.

It’s legal for lenders to transfer student loans, but they must alert consumers if the servicer changes. Under a new state law written by the Illinois attorney general, they will have to alert consumers 15 days before the transfer instead of 45 days after.

“Not everyone has a college fund, you want your kids to go to college and have a good education and have a good life and you take out a loan and without your knowledge it keeps being bought and sold by different lenders,” Mack said.

Borrowers also have a responsibility to inquire if they’re strangely not seeing bills or debits from a lender.

That loan is not going to disappear – it’s most likely been transferred or sold.

Also, Illinois law says that student loan lenders must offer a lower payment option to borrowers in financial trouble.

Source:-abc7chicago.

How Much Do You Own Your Career?

Suppose you buy the principle from my previous article that you need to own your career. You understand that you live in an innovation-driven economy, your learning must keep pace and employability is your responsibility. How, then, can you apply the principle of career ownership to yourself?

Career ownership is a natural extension of living in a democratic society, and exercising choice. Moreover, your career is not a physical artifact, like a dining table, that can stay in the same condition for a lifetime. Your career is always in a state of flux: shaping, and being shaped by, the outside environment. Here are some questions you can ask to test where you stand right now.

Where can you go? This first question calls for you to look beyond what’s familiar. What is the wider market for the work you can do, and the further learning that you seek? Do you have the skills to do something different? What do you know about employers that may value your talents? Are there opportunities for you to work in virtual space, from your own home? Whom can you talk to in order to find out more information? Are there part-time, or contract work or volunteer opportunities that can help you go in a new direction?

Who’s supporting you? Owning your career ought not to be a solitary activity. On the contrary, having friends, family, colleagues, and mentors who support you is an essential part of career ownership. Within this overall group you can identify a smaller group, an imaginary “board of directors” that you hold in high regard. What does your imaginary board look like? What kind of board vacancy would you like to fill? You can expect fluidity among your supporters, including adding new ones in return for favors you did them. In this way, effective “give and take” can play an important part in developing your support system over time.

Where’s your reputation? This question differs from the previous one. Its focus is on the people—bosses, customers, project team members, occupational peers and so on—who have directly experienced your work and respect what you can do. Over time, you can expect your reputation to become scattered across a wider area. Moreover, you don’t need to move to grow your reputation. That can happen through other people moving, and taking your reputation to new places. Many career moves stem from an unanticipated phone call from a former co-worker who knows your worth.

Who’s your agent? You will be familiar with the idea of an agent from the worlds of professional sports, or movie-making or the theater. You may not think you need any equivalent in your own career. However, it’s important to see that your agent may not be an individual person, but a function performed by a range of people. It’s common for bosses, co-workers, headhunters, and contractors from the past to want to work with you again. It’s useful to map out who those people are, and to keep in touch so that they stand ready to help again as your career moves forward.

What’s the next step? The most important point here is that you take a next step, and in turn another, and another. You may be under a lot of pressure to deliver results in your present job, or have little free time, or have family obligations that restrict what you’d really like to do. However, to practice career ownership you owe it to yourself to do something, however small a step that may be. That something can lead to a fresh round of experimentation that leads in turn to a new door of opportunity.sking where can you go, who’s supporting you, where’s your reputation, who’s your agent and what’s the next step can make you a more informed contributor to a democratic society. They can also take you a long way toward owning your career.

Source:-.forbes

Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compare

Image result for Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compareLawyer Rohan Mahajan got an unexpected call a few years back. Nirbhaya’s parents were calling for help when the case reached the Supreme Court. Mahajan brought in senior counsels to help on a pro bono basis (free of cost). “Everyone is helpless when it comes to legal support. While financial success is not guaranteed, you get the opportunity to help people and do something right,” said Mahajan.

This is only one of the reasons why law is an evergreen career opt

Suppose you buy the principle from my previous article that you need to own your career. You understand that you live in an innovation-driven economy, your learning must keep pace and employability is your responsibility. How, then, can you apply the principle of career ownership to yourself?

Career ownership is a natural extension of living in a democratic society, and exercising choice. Moreover, your career is not a physical artifact, like a dining table, that can stay in the same condition for a lifetime. Your career is always in a state of flux: shaping, and being shaped by, the outside environment. Here are some questions you can ask to test where you stand right now.

Where can you go? This first question calls for you to look beyond what’s familiar. What is the wider market for the work you can do, and the further learning that you seek? Do you have the skills to do something different? What do you know about employers that may value your talents? Are there opportunities for you to work in virtual space, from your own home? Whom can you talk to in order to find out more information? Are there part-time, or contract work or volunteer opportunities that can help you go in a new direction?

Who’s supporting you? Owning your career ought not to be a solitary activity. On the contrary, having friends, family, colleagues, and mentors who support you is an essential part of career ownership. Within this overall group you can identify a smaller group, an imaginary “board of directors” that you hold in high regard. What does your imaginary board look like? What kind of board vacancy would you like to fill? You can expect fluidity among your supporters, including adding new ones in return for favors you did them. In this way, effective “give and take” can play an important part in developing your support system over time.

Where’s your reputation? This question differs from the previous one. Its focus is on the people—bosses, customers, project team members, occupational peers and so on—who have directly experienced your work and respect what you can do. Over time, you can expect your reputation to become scattered across a wider area. Moreover, you don’t need to move to grow your reputation. That can happen through other people moving, and taking your reputation to new places. Many career moves stem from an unanticipated phone call from a former co-worker who knows your worth.

Who’s your agent? You will be familiar with the idea of an agent from the worlds of professional sports, or movie-making or the theater. You may not think you need any equivalent in your own career. However, it’s important to see that your agent may not be an individual person, but a function performed by a range of people. It’s common for bosses, co-workers, headhunters, and contractors from the past to want to work with you again. It’s useful to map out who those people are, and to keep in touch so that they stand ready to help again as your career moves forward.

What’s the next step? The most important point here is that you take a next step, and in turn another, and another. You may be under a lot of pressure to deliver results in your present job, or have little free time, or have family obligations that restrict what you’d really like to do. However, to practice career ownership you owe it to yourself to do something, however small a step that may be. That something can lead to a fresh round of experimentation that leads in turn to a new door of opportunity.sking where can you go, who’s supporting you, where’s your reputation, who’s your agent and what’s the next step can make you a more informed contributor to a democratic society. They can also take you a long way toward owning your career.

Source:-.forbes

ion. It has a certain degree of prestige attached to it. Whether it is Ram Jethmalani and Mukul Rohatgi who have taken it up as a profession or the likes of P Chidambaram and Arun Jaitley who are lawyers by qualification, they are all well known.

cou

Besides, the country is always pressed for those with knowledge of legal matters. “As people become more educated and aware of the law, we find the number of court cases increasing, which means that there is great demand for lawyers. In a country which has a population of 1.3 billion, the number of lawyers is a minuscule 1 million. India needs more lawyers to cater to this burgeoning population,” said Ashwin Madhavan,founder, Enhelion, a legal education company.

Law offers a variety of sub-specialities that one can choose from. For those interested in the corporate and business aspects, there is corporate law. For those intrigued by crime, there is criminal law. Today, several niche areas have arisen from traditional practices such as civil or criminal litigation. For instance, one can specialise in laws related to media and entertainment. Rising awareness of environmental issues such as the use of clean technology, renewable energy, managing carbon assets and keeping greenhouse gas inventories has created work for environmental law attorneys, adds Mahajan. Taxation and banking remain areas that corporates are always looking for professional help on and a specialisation in this area could be useful.

Experts in the space add that these labels can be convenient but the work involves understanding the core tenets. For instance, specialising in sports law or entertainment law also involves looking at these areas through the realm of commerce or commercial law.

Being a lawyer is also about being multi-skilled. Madhavan of Enhelion says effective oral communication, strong research and analytical skills along with good interpersonal skills and the ability to understand and listen to the client are all crucial skills to have.

Once one becomes a lawyer, there are multiple avenues to look at. “As a lawyer, you have the option to set up your law firm to learn the ropes, become a part of the judiciary, or enjoy the thrills of a corporate practice by being an in-house counsel to a multi-national company,” says Mahajan.

Many young lawyers with an entrepreneurial streak set up their own practice early in their career. For instance, Mahajan has set up LawRato.com as an online legal marketplace.One can also choose to specialise in a particular area or focus on a select set of areas. Rodney D Ryder, founding partner of Scriboard Advocates and Legal Consultants dons many hats. From managing the complete trademark portfolio for cricketer MS Dhoni and some teams, he also works in the area of information technology and Intellectual Property. Ryder also works with startups as they develop their ideas and products by helping them protect their ideas from being infringed upon. “There are always new and interesting areas to be explored. For instance, today the interface being technology or internet and law is an exciting new path. With all the discussion on data privacy, this is an offbeat track to look at,” said Ryder.
Other than these regular career paths, lawyers are also holding influential positions in the government sectors to work as policy makers for affecting a national/global change, adds Mahajan.

Being a lawyer gives you an opportunity to do some good while you work. For instance, Mahajan’s LawRato.com offers free legal aid for certain people such as victims of crime, war heroes and war widows.

While early years can be a struggle financially, as one moves up the ladder, the profession can be very lucrative. Senior counsels who are consulted by top business honchos and politicians are known charge several lakhs for an hour of their time.

source:-timesofindia.indiatimes

Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compare

Image result for Of Bar, bench and a career that is beyond compare

Lawyer Rohan Mahajan got an unexpected call a few years back. Nirbhaya’s parents were calling for help when the case reached the Supreme Court. Mahajan brought in senior counsels to help on a pro bono basis (free of cost). “Everyone is helpless when it comes to legal support. While financial success is not guaranteed, you get the opportunity to help people and do something right,” said Mahajan.

This is only one of the reasons why law is an evergreen career opt

Suppose you buy the principle from my previous article that you need to own your career. You understand that you live in an innovation-driven economy, your learning must keep pace and employability is your responsibility. How, then, can you apply the principle of career ownership to yourself?

Career ownership is a natural extension of living in a democratic society, and exercising choice. Moreover, your career is not a physical artifact, like a dining table, that can stay in the same condition for a lifetime. Your career is always in a state of flux: shaping, and being shaped by, the outside environment. Here are some questions you can ask to test where you stand right now.

Where can you go? This first question calls for you to look beyond what’s familiar. What is the wider market for the work you can do, and the further learning that you seek? Do you have the skills to do something different? What do you know about employers that may value your talents? Are there opportunities for you to work in virtual space, from your own home? Whom can you talk to in order to find out more information? Are there part-time, or contract work or volunteer opportunities that can help you go in a new direction?

Who’s supporting you? Owning your career ought not to be a solitary activity. On the contrary, having friends, family, colleagues, and mentors who support you is an essential part of career ownership. Within this overall group you can identify a smaller group, an imaginary “board of directors” that you hold in high regard. What does your imaginary board look like? What kind of board vacancy would you like to fill? You can expect fluidity among your supporters, including adding new ones in return for favors you did them. In this way, effective “give and take” can play an important part in developing your support system over time.

Where’s your reputation? This question differs from the previous one. Its focus is on the people—bosses, customers, project team members, occupational peers and so on—who have directly experienced your work and respect what you can do. Over time, you can expect your reputation to become scattered across a wider area. Moreover, you don’t need to move to grow your reputation. That can happen through other people moving, and taking your reputation to new places. Many career moves stem from an unanticipated phone call from a former co-worker who knows your worth.

Who’s your agent? You will be familiar with the idea of an agent from the worlds of professional sports, or movie-making or the theater. You may not think you need any equivalent in your own career. However, it’s important to see that your agent may not be an individual person, but a function performed by a range of people. It’s common for bosses, co-workers, headhunters, and contractors from the past to want to work with you again. It’s useful to map out who those people are, and to keep in touch so that they stand ready to help again as your career moves forward.

What’s the next step? The most important point here is that you take a next step, and in turn another, and another. You may be under a lot of pressure to deliver results in your present job, or have little free time, or have family obligations that restrict what you’d really like to do. However, to practice career ownership you owe it to yourself to do something, however small a step that may be. That something can lead to a fresh round of experimentation that leads in turn to a new door of opportunity.sking where can you go, who’s supporting you, where’s your reputation, who’s your agent and what’s the next step can make you a more informed contributor to a democratic society. They can also take you a long way toward owning your career.

Source:-.forbes

ion. It has a certain degree of prestige attached to it. Whether it is Ram Jethmalani and Mukul Rohatgi who have taken it up as a profession or the likes of P Chidambaram and Arun Jaitley who are lawyers by qualification, they are all well known.

cou

Besides, the country is always pressed for those with knowledge of legal matters. “As people become more educated and aware of the law, we find the number of court cases increasing, which means that there is great demand for lawyers. In a country which has a population of 1.3 billion, the number of lawyers is a minuscule 1 million. India needs more lawyers to cater to this burgeoning population,” said Ashwin Madhavan,founder, Enhelion, a legal education company.

Law offers a variety of sub-specialities that one can choose from. For those interested in the corporate and business aspects, there is corporate law. For those intrigued by crime, there is criminal law. Today, several niche areas have arisen from traditional practices such as civil or criminal litigation. For instance, one can specialise in laws related to media and entertainment. Rising awareness of environmental issues such as the use of clean technology, renewable energy, managing carbon assets and keeping greenhouse gas inventories has created work for environmental law attorneys, adds Mahajan. Taxation and banking remain areas that corporates are always looking for professional help on and a specialisation in this area could be useful.

Experts in the space add that these labels can be convenient but the work involves understanding the core tenets. For instance, specialising in sports law or entertainment law also involves looking at these areas through the realm of commerce or commercial law.

Being a lawyer is also about being multi-skilled. Madhavan of Enhelion says effective oral communication, strong research and analytical skills along with good interpersonal skills and the ability to understand and listen to the client are all crucial skills to have.

Once one becomes a lawyer, there are multiple avenues to look at. “As a lawyer, you have the option to set up your law firm to learn the ropes, become a part of the judiciary, or enjoy the thrills of a corporate practice by being an in-house counsel to a multi-national company,” says Mahajan.

Many young lawyers with an entrepreneurial streak set up their own practice early in their career. For instance, Mahajan has set up LawRato.com as an online legal marketplace.One can also choose to specialise in a particular area or focus on a select set of areas. Rodney D Ryder, founding partner of Scriboard Advocates and Legal Consultants dons many hats. From managing the complete trademark portfolio for cricketer MS Dhoni and some teams, he also works in the area of information technology and Intellectual Property. Ryder also works with startups as they develop their ideas and products by helping them protect their ideas from being infringed upon. “There are always new and interesting areas to be explored. For instance, today the interface being technology or internet and law is an exciting new path. With all the discussion on data privacy, this is an offbeat track to look at,” said Ryder.
Other than these regular career paths, lawyers are also holding influential positions in the government sectors to work as policy makers for affecting a national/global change, adds Mahajan.

Being a lawyer gives you an opportunity to do some good while you work. For instance, Mahajan’s LawRato.com offers free legal aid for certain people such as victims of crime, war heroes and war widows.

While early years can be a struggle financially, as one moves up the ladder, the profession can be very lucrative. Senior counsels who are consulted by top business honchos and politicians are known charge several lakhs for an hour of their time.

source:-timesofindia.indiatimes

Delph credits ‘genius’ Pep with career turnaround

fabiandelph-cropped

Fabian Delph paid tribute to Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola for helping him to hit form in time for the World Cup, saying: “He has reinvented me.”

The 28-year-old was England’s outstanding player as the Three Lions beat Costa Rica 2-0 in their final warm-up game before flying out to Russia, and he spoke about how Guardiola’s footballing vision has altered his approach to the game.

Having spent most of his career as a midfielder, Delph played at full-back in many of his 22 Premier League appearances for City last season and said his understanding of tactics and positional play has broadened under the Catalan.

“He’s fantastic. For me, he is a genius,” Delph told reporters. “He has opened my eyes to so much. I didn’t picture football like Pep does. He’s painted the pictures for me.

“I stayed mentally strong, and I knew if I got my opportunity to play I could contribute and help the lads win games.

“I’m a very traditional English guy who believes in hard work and dedication and giving it absolutely everything. I’m there to fight and pick up second balls, to be that old English type of player, but he has reinvented me.

“Now it’s all about being calm and collected on the ball, being sensible in terms of if someone occupies my position then I need to occupy a different position. We’ve got so many systems the way we played. Everybody seems to think, ‘Wow, what are they doing?’ But it is very simple.”

Delph, whose wife is expecting their third child in the next few weeks, is hoping to add to his 11 England caps by playing a part at the World Cup in Russia and his recent performances have strengthened his chances of featuring in Gareth Southgate’s team to face Tunisia on June 18.

The Bradford-born dynamo also credited a new personal regime of meditation and breathing techniques for helping him to refine and improve his game.

He said: “Gael Clichy, who was at City, does a lot of meditation and he recommend it to me because I was such an all-action guy, so I started it and I’ve never looked back.

“I do it in numerous ways – you can do guided meditation, depending on how you are feeling. You can get these things on YouTube or get apps on your phone.

“For me it is just breathing techniques, learning to be still, to control your thought processes. It wasn’t about dealing with the pressure of games – I’ve always been all right in matches. But I’m an intense guy, I always want to do more and my mind is racing at 100mph.”

“I have always trained with crazy intensity,” he added. “I work very hard in the gym and out on the pitch. It was all about trying to find a balance, not go into it as crazy as I did. It has calmed me down.”

Source:-sportskeeda.c

How to Recharge Your Career In The Second Half Of Life

Story image for Career from Forbes

Researchers are predicting that scientific advances could have millennials living to 100 or longer; the standard 30- to 40-year career could be extended by a decade or two. Combine that with the speed of technological advances, plus the fact that jobs we have never heard of will emerge as the hottest roles to have. What will the future of careers look like and how can we prepare for that now?

I sat down with an old friend, Marci Alboher, who is a leading expert in encore careers – finding meaningful work in the second half of life. When I first met Marci, she had coined the term “slash” as it relates to careers and lifestyle. She had just published her first book, One Person/Multiple Careers – a roadmap for building a life that embraces the slash lifestyle and the concept of custom-blending a career.

Today she is one of the leaders in the encore movement, serving as a VP at Encore.org, which is innovating new models to tap the talent of people 50+ as a force for good. Her latest latest book, The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life, takes some of her earlier thinking and applies it to retirement: reinvented, re-envisioned, and reinvigorated.

I asked her what mindset we need to adopt so we can remain relevant and fulfilled in the rapidly changing landscape of extended careers. She shared four fundamental actions we can take to ensure success and happiness in that second chapter.

1. Cultivate your slashes.

William Arruda: What does “cultivate your slashes” mean, and how do we go about doing it?

Marci Alboher: When I wrote the slash book more than ten years ago, I had noticed that juggling various work identities concurrently — the website designer / yoga instructor, caterer / teacher — was starting to go mainstream. Slashing is now less exotic. In fact, millennials just consider this the normal way of living!  If you can work anywhere with an internet connection, it’s easy to shift between very different kinds of work activities. A few things to consider: First, think about a balance that gets you using different parts of your brain or that gets you spending your time in different ways. If you spend a lot of your time staring at a computer screen for example, it’s great to complement that with something that gets you out in the world or using your hands in some way. Second, recognize that we become expert at things when we immerse fully for a while. So pace yourself, giving yourself time to do that before jumping into a new arena. Finally, recognize that some pursuits are easy to pair and others more complicated.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

How To Recharge Your Career In The Second Half Of Life

Story image for Career from Forbes

Researchers are predicting that scientific advances could have millennials living to 100 or longer; the standard 30- to 40-year career could be extended by a decade or two. Combine that with the speed of technological advances, plus the fact that jobs we have never heard of will emerge as the hottest roles to have. What will the future of careers look like and how can we prepare for that now?

I sat down with an old friend, Marci Alboher, who is a leading expert in encore careers – finding meaningful work in the second half of life. When I first met Marci, she had coined the term “slash” as it relates to careers and lifestyle. She had just published her first book, One Person/Multiple Careers – a roadmap for building a life that embraces the slash lifestyle and the concept of custom-blending a career.

Today she is one of the leaders in the encore movement, serving as a VP at Encore.org, which is innovating new models to tap the talent of people 50+ as a force for good. Her latest latest book, The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life, takes some of her earlier thinking and applies it to retirement: reinvented, re-envisioned, and reinvigorated.

I asked her what mindset we need to adopt so we can remain relevant and fulfilled in the rapidly changing landscape of extended careers. She shared four fundamental actions we can take to ensure success and happiness in that second chapter.

1. Cultivate your slashes.

William Arruda: What does “cultivate your slashes” mean, and how do we go about doing it?

Marci Alboher: When I wrote the slash book more than ten years ago, I had noticed that juggling various work identities concurrently — the website designer / yoga instructor, caterer / teacher — was starting to go mainstream. Slashing is now less exotic. In fact, millennials just consider this the normal way of living!  If you can work anywhere with an internet connection, it’s easy to shift between very different kinds of work activities. A few things to consider: First, think about a balance that gets you using different parts of your brain or that gets you spending your time in different ways. If you spend a lot of your time staring at a computer screen for example, it’s great to complement that with something that gets you out in the world or using your hands in some way. Second, recognize that we become expert at things when we immerse fully for a while. So pace yourself, giving yourself time to do that before jumping into a new arena. Finally, recognize that some pursuits are easy to pair and others more complicated.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

Meet the new “Career of the Year” Barbie

Do the robot: These Barbies are ready to join the 21st century as robotics engineers, a new career for the Mattel doll.

The fantasy world of Barbie dolls just got more high-tech. On Tuesday, Mattel, the company that makes the famous stick figurine, announced Barbie’s new career: robotics engineer.

The “Career of the Year” Barbie is now available online for $13.99. She comes with safety goggles, a doll-sized laptop computer, and a small humanoid robot.

While robotics engineer is a first-ever career for Barbie, she’s previously had several occupations in science, technology, engineering, and math, including as a computer engineer, astronaut, and video game developer.

But this Barbie is more than just a doll, say STEM experts involved in its creation and launch.

“I’m excited because [the doll] allows our girls to imagine a future that I didn’t have at their age,” says Kimberly Bryant, an electrical engineer and founder of Black Girls Code, a nonprofit educational organization that’s received a grant from Barbie to help reach girls interested in the field. Some participants in the organization’s robotics workshops will receive the new Barbie doll.

Mattel will also offer seven free “Barbie-inspired” coding experiences through Tynker, an online platform that provides coding classes to children. The lessons will focus on logic, problem-solving, and other coding skills.

Bryant believes the robotics engineer Barbie, which comes in four skin tones, could help young girls imagine themselves in a STEM field at an early age. Women hold only 24 percentof STEM jobs in the United States, and Bryant says that lack of representation, both in pop culture and in the workplace, can deter women from entering and remaining in STEM careers.

Bryant’s favorite aspect of the doll is how her career represents the “intersection” of technology and engineering — in other words, coding a computer program and building a robot.

Barbie has an impressive resume. These are just a few of the STEM careers she's had over the years.

Barbie has an impressive resume. These are just a few of the STEM careers she’s had over the years.

IMAGE: MATTEL

Barbie enlisted Cynthia Breazeal, associate professor of media arts and sciences at MIT and founder of the social robot company Jibo, Inc., to ensure that the doll and her accessories accurately reflect the typical robotics engineer. The product packaging art depicts an industrial robot workspace, the robot looks similar to one you might find in hobbyist workshops, and the robot’s sprocket parts actually work.

Breazeal hopes the doll introduces girls to artificial intelligence and encourages them to learn more about robotics and engineering. Imaginative play with Barbie could include pretending to program a robot to do chores or homework.

“I think it opens up girls’ imaginations [to the idea] that intelligent machines can be in their daily lives,” says Breazeal.

That point isn’t a small one. With AI driving innovations in everyday products like phones, cars, and even doorbells, Breazeal says it’s imperative that the workforce behind those developments be as diverse as possible.

“When you talk about something like artificial intelligence, we cannot only have a few highly educated people” accessing and interacting with it, she says. “The democratization of these technologies is very, very important.”

Years from now, we’ll no doubt hear from pioneering female robotics engineers who fondly remember their “Career of the Year” doll.

source:-mashable