JIPMER MBBS Entrance 2018: Admit cards released, here’s how to download

The JIPMER admit card has candidate’s name, date of birth, photo, signature image and examination city allotted and roll number.

Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry (JIPMER) on Monday released the admit card or hall tickets of the entrance exam for admissions into its MBBS programme. The Common entrance test will be held on June 3 for selecting 200 candidates, out of which 150 will be admitted at the prestigious institute at Puducherry and 50 at the JIPMER, Karaikal.

Candidates can download their admit cards from the official website of the JIPMER by clicking here. Key in your user id and password to download the admit card. Take a printout of the hall ticket and save it on your computer too.

The admit card has candidate’s name, date of birth, photo, signature image and examination city allotted and roll number. Candidates must carry the admit card to the examination centre along with an Identity (ID) proof in original and a photocopy of the same.

Candidates are requested to reach the exam venue two hours before the commencement of the exam to avoid any last-minute hassles. They are also advised to visit the exam venue one day before the examination.

The morning shift exam will start at 10am and the entry to the center will close at 9:15am. The afternoon shift will start at 3pm and the entry to the center will close at 2.15pm.

The entrance test will be of two hours and thirty minutes duration. It will be conducted in online mode. There will be 200 objective type questions (MCOs) ( 60 each from physics, chemistry and biology and 10 each from English language and comprehension and logical and quantitative reasoning). Each correct answer will fetch 4 marks and for each wrong answer one marks will be deducted (negative marking). No marks will be deducted for unanswered questions.

The MBBS course at the JIPMER will be of four years and six months duration followed by one year of compulsory rotatory internship for getting the degree.

The result or merit list of the test is expected to be declared on or before June 20.

Note: Candidates should visit the official website of JIPMER regularly for latest updates and details.

Source:-.hindustantimes.

How about a study-abroad adventure in Europe?

How about a study-abroad adventure in Europe?

Over the past few years, I have penned a number of articles examining schools outside Japan as possible destinations for higher education.

In my first piece, I presented the results of a survey of graduates matriculating to overseas universities from high schools across Japan, giving particular attention to the costs involved. In a following article, I used a recent study by a Stanford University student to examine why students considering overseas study often decide to stay in Japan instead.

I then conducted a critical review of the Yanai Tadashi scholarship, a grand source of funding made available only to those matriculating to America’s most selective schools. And afterward, I responded to a reader’s suggestion to examine Canada as a possible destination for higher education.

Shortly afterward, I was contacted by Gavin Williams, Kumon Kokusai Gakuen‘s overseas university counselor, who kindly shared his thoughts about a number of “good value” schools in continental Europe offering programs in English, posing the question, “Why not Europe?”

A continent of pros and cons

Before we take a closer look at a handful of universities, let’s skip to the all-important bottom line: The annual cost for each of the four schools featured below is similar to the cost for international students matriculating to Canada, yet somewhat lower than the sticker prices at many U.S. universities. (For the details, see the bottom of each section.)

However, one key factor should be considered: Most students complete degree programs at these European schools in three years — i.e., one year less than is common in Canada and the U.S. — so the total cost of undergraduate programs at these European schools could end up being significantly less.

Now, what are the concerns that a student should consider before selecting these European schools as possible destinations?

First, you need to have a fairly good idea of where your passion lies and the field of study you intend to pursue. If you are looking for a liberal arts experience that will allow you a few years to explore a wide variety of interests in various fields of study, or an open curriculum like that found at Brown University permitting you to craft your own major, the European schools below may not be for you.

Second, because English-taught degrees are relatively new throughout much of Europe, there are not many senpai (seniors) to provide advice, guidance and assistance. You will most likely end up being the future senpai for others. If requested, many of these universities will make an attempt to put you in touch with Japanese graduates, though, but those will often be graduates from master’s programs.

Third, life at these schools often requires use of a third language — e.g., when out on the town in Milan or Madrid. Some might welcome this adventure and the prospect of acquiring another language or two; others may shy away from the added dissonance.

One issue that we have not addressed in any of the previous articles concerns job prospects in the country of study after graduation. If you graduate from a U.S. university and desire to work in the U.S., for example, getting a visa to do so for more than a year can be challenging unless you have STEM (science, technology, engineering or math) expertise or you marry a U.S. national. Canada is more welcoming. In fact, according to Statistics Canada, 32 percent of international students starting bachelor’s degrees in Canada become permanent residents within 10 years of entering university.

Veronica Sullo of Milan-based Bocconi University was quick to point out that work visas for non-EU/EEA nationals from Bocconi should not be a problem in the business sector, but she added, “The majority of international or multinational companies located in Italy may require candidates to be fluent in Italian in order to be hired permanently.”

The Careers Department at Madrid’s IE University offered the following: “After completing their studies, there are various ways how non-EU graduates could stay in Spain, should they wish to. Options include applying for a high-skilled qualified visa (open to students graduating from top schools, such as IE).”

Non-EU/EEA nationals matriculating from German universities are eligible for residence permits that allow them to reside in the country for 18 months while seeking employment. And once a job contract is secured, those individuals become eligible for an EU Blue Card, which enables the holder to live and work anywhere in the EU.

International graduates of Dutch universities can similarly apply for an “orientation year” that will allow them to stay in the Netherlands and look for a job for up to a year from the date of graduation. And if a job is found and salary benchmarks met, a Dutch work visa can be acquired. A year later, an application for an EU Blue Card can be submitted.

For the family of today, university education is often something of a business choice in which costs are weighed against benefits. And with a confluence of quality, cultural diversity and value, Europe might be the right decision for some Japanese students.

And we haven’t even mentioned lifestyle. On that note, Risa Hasegawa, a University of Tokyo undergraduate currently doing a year at Leiden University in the Netherlands as an exchange student, had this to say:

“Life here is relaxing and enjoyable. People don’t focus too much on work; they do what they have to do and, after that, people enjoy their life. They spend their free time with people they love or doing things they like to do. It could be traveling, camping, drinking on a boat, reading a book or just lying in the grass on a sunny day. I learned what it means to live happily in Europe.”

With a little imagination and planning, this could be you. Why not indeed.

Award winner: Bocconi University
Award winner: Bocconi University’s faculty building in Milan was named World Building of the Year at the inaugural World Architecture Festival in 2008. | COURTESY OF BOCCONI UNIVERSITY

Bocconi University

For students looking to pursue careers in economics, management or finance, Williams recommends Bocconi University in Milan, a renowned business school where undergraduate programs can generally can be completed in three years. For those desiring an additional year of study, Bocconi also offers a new and very alluring four-year World Bachelor in Business degree. In this program, students spend their first year at the University of Southern California, their second at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, their third at Bocconi and their fourth at a partner school of their choice — completing their studies with experience on three continents and perhaps command of several languages to boot.

“We are looking for responsible, independent students who are ready to leave their comfort zone,” Veronica Sullo of Bocconi’s Recruitment Office says. “Bocconi students like to be challenged, to learn and interact with different cultures.”

The bachelor of science degrees in business and management are of particular note, and the QS University Rankings of this area of study regularly include Bocconi in the top 10 worldwide. Bocconi also offers exchange and double-degree programs with 270 universities worldwide, including Waseda and Keio. And 85 percent of Bocconi students pursue a master’s degree immediately after graduating, often moving on to other schools in Europe, such as the London Business School.

Bocconi University, Milan: 14,000 students; 7,600 undergraduates; 38 percent of students in classes taught in English are international; estimated annual cost €25,358 (¥3.3 million) Admissions: SAT (over 1270 (suggested)), ACT (over 30) or Bocconi’s own test delivered in Milan and Shanghai at fixed dates three times a year; IELTS 6.5 or TOEFL 89

IE University

IE University began operating in 2009, building on the success of one of Europe’s top business schools. IE has two campuses — one in the historic city of Segovia, a UNESCO World Heritage site 25 minutes from Madrid, and the other in the heart of Madrid’s business district. The school also has a very diverse student population, and the campus is growing. In fact, an impressive 35-story rectangular tower is set to open in 2020 and add to IE’s technology-based, sustainable urban campus model. Williams would recommend IE to students seeking a broader spectrum of career options, including business administration, international relations, architectural studies and law (with both European and U.S. tracks).

Kaoru Inoue, director of IE’s Tokyo office, says, “We are looking for open-minded Japanese students who are willing to learn from one another, dare to be different, and embrace change as a form of growth and innovation to make the world and society a better place.”

With a focus on diversity, innovation and interaction, her message for Japanese students is: “Learning from international faculty and working on a lot of practical group projects with your classmates from all over the world will enable you to be ready to start a career, doing what you really love, no matter where it is on the globe.”

IE University, Madrid: 2,900 students (67 percent of which are international); estimated annual cost €35,504 (¥4.6 million) Admissions: SAT (minimum 1,200), ACT (min. 24), LNAT (min. 22) or IE University admissions test at local office in Tokyo; Skype interview; no TOEFL

Dutch master
Dutch master’s?: The historic rooms and facades of Leiden University’s prestigious Academy Building have been restored to their pre-1878 state featuring a palette of Old Dutch colors. | COURTESY OF LEIDEN UNIVERSITY

Leiden University

For an even wider range of options, students might look farther north to Leiden in Holland. Founded in 1575 by William of Silent, the Prince of Orange, Leiden is the oldest university in the Netherlands. The school offers 12 English-taught bachelor’s programs — including political science, South and Southeast Asian studies, linguistics and Dutch studies — and also has an exciting liberal arts and sciences program at The Hague, proudly known as the international city of peace and justice. In fact, in the Times Higher Education 2018 rankings, Leiden was ranked 25th worldwide in the field of arts and humanities.

The Times ranking puts Leiden’s international student percentage at 12 percent, but according to Carolyn Barr, the school’s international relations officer, the range of overseas students in the English-taught bachelor’s programs generally falls between 30 and 80 percent. She also notes that the majority of students choose to pursue a master’s program, some staying on at Leiden and others moving elsewhere. Of Japanese candidates, she says, “We are looking for motivated, academically excellent students who value making and sharing their own opinions, doing research and contributing to the international flavor of Leiden University.”

Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands: 28,000 students (of which 12 percent are international); estimated annual cost: €22,600 (¥2.9 million) Admissions: Varies according to high school diploma (e.g., IB, etc.), but good GPA generally required; TOEFL iBT 90, IELTS 6.5 or Cambridge CAE grade C

Carl Benz School at the KIT

Located in the south of Germany within a lively science, research and high-tech hub, the Carl Benz School at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology would be perfect for a future mechanical engineer with excellent high school grades in math and physics. The three-year program includes a 12-week industrial internship — possibly at nearby Daimler, Siemens or Bosch — and often leads to careers in design, production, logistics and product management.

In fact, the specialized nature of the courses on offer, the reputation of the school and its strong industry network position KIT as a leader in graduate employability (ranked No. 30 worldwide in the 2018 QS University Rankings). Williams mentioned that a number of Kumon Kokusai graduates have attended KIT and gone on to careers in traditional engineering and IT.

Carl Benz School at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany: Up to 150 students (90 percent international); estimated annual cost €23,055 (¥3 million) Admissions: TOEIC 880 or TOEFL iBT 88, new SAT 1,200

Other options

There are plenty of opportunities in other areas, and many colleges afford a unique entry point to their corresponding professional spheres.

The six-year International Medical Doctor Program at Vita-Salute San Raffaele University in Italy has been designed “to foster a new kind of doctor” and could lead to a career in medicine without the eye-watering costs often involved.

Ecole hoteliere de Lausanne is a hospitality management school in Switzerland and stands among the best in the world, with alumni dignifying five-star hotels and resorts in every corner of the globe.

source:-japantimes

How Much Do You Own Your Career?

Suppose you buy the principle from my previous article that you need to own your career. You understand that you live in an innovation-driven economy, your learning must keep pace and employability is your responsibility. How, then, can you apply the principle of career ownership to yourself?

Career ownership is a natural extension of living in a democratic society, and exercising choice. Moreover, your career is not a physical artifact, like a dining table, that can stay in the same condition for a lifetime. Your career is always in a state of flux: shaping, and being shaped by, the outside environment. Here are some questions you can ask to test where you stand right now.

Where can you go? This first question calls for you to look beyond what’s familiar. What is the wider market for the work you can do, and the further learning that you seek? Do you have the skills to do something different? What do you know about employers that may value your talents? Are there opportunities for you to work in virtual space, from your own home? Whom can you talk to in order to find out more information? Are there part-time, or contract work or volunteer opportunities that can help you go in a new direction?

Who’s supporting you? Owning your career ought not to be a solitary activity. On the contrary, having friends, family, colleagues, and mentors who support you is an essential part of career ownership. Within this overall group you can identify a smaller group, an imaginary “board of directors” that you hold in high regard. What does your imaginary board look like? What kind of board vacancy would you like to fill? You can expect fluidity among your supporters, including adding new ones in return for favors you did them. In this way, effective “give and take” can play an important part in developing your support system over time.

Where’s your reputation? This question differs from the previous one. Its focus is on the people—bosses, customers, project team members, occupational peers and so on—who have directly experienced your work and respect what you can do. Over time, you can expect your reputation to become scattered across a wider area. Moreover, you don’t need to move to grow your reputation. That can happen through other people moving, and taking your reputation to new places. Many career moves stem from an unanticipated phone call from a former co-worker who knows your worth.

Who’s your agent? You will be familiar with the idea of an agent from the worlds of professional sports, or movie-making or the theater. You may not think you need any equivalent in your own career. However, it’s important to see that your agent may not be an individual person, but a function performed by a range of people. It’s common for bosses, co-workers, headhunters, and contractors from the past to want to work with you again. It’s useful to map out who those people are, and to keep in touch so that they stand ready to help again as your career moves forward.

What’s the next step? The most important point here is that you take a next step, and in turn another, and another. You may be under a lot of pressure to deliver results in your present job, or have little free time, or have family obligations that restrict what you’d really like to do. However, to practice career ownership you owe it to yourself to do something, however small a step that may be. That something can lead to a fresh round of experimentation that leads in turn to a new door of opportunity.sking where can you go, who’s supporting you, where’s your reputation, who’s your agent and what’s the next step can make you a more informed contributor to a democratic society. They can also take you a long way toward owning your career.

Source:-.forbes

How to Recharge Your Career In The Second Half Of Life

Story image for Career from Forbes

Researchers are predicting that scientific advances could have millennials living to 100 or longer; the standard 30- to 40-year career could be extended by a decade or two. Combine that with the speed of technological advances, plus the fact that jobs we have never heard of will emerge as the hottest roles to have. What will the future of careers look like and how can we prepare for that now?

I sat down with an old friend, Marci Alboher, who is a leading expert in encore careers – finding meaningful work in the second half of life. When I first met Marci, she had coined the term “slash” as it relates to careers and lifestyle. She had just published her first book, One Person/Multiple Careers – a roadmap for building a life that embraces the slash lifestyle and the concept of custom-blending a career.

Today she is one of the leaders in the encore movement, serving as a VP at Encore.org, which is innovating new models to tap the talent of people 50+ as a force for good. Her latest latest book, The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life, takes some of her earlier thinking and applies it to retirement: reinvented, re-envisioned, and reinvigorated.

I asked her what mindset we need to adopt so we can remain relevant and fulfilled in the rapidly changing landscape of extended careers. She shared four fundamental actions we can take to ensure success and happiness in that second chapter.

1. Cultivate your slashes.

William Arruda: What does “cultivate your slashes” mean, and how do we go about doing it?

Marci Alboher: When I wrote the slash book more than ten years ago, I had noticed that juggling various work identities concurrently — the website designer / yoga instructor, caterer / teacher — was starting to go mainstream. Slashing is now less exotic. In fact, millennials just consider this the normal way of living!  If you can work anywhere with an internet connection, it’s easy to shift between very different kinds of work activities. A few things to consider: First, think about a balance that gets you using different parts of your brain or that gets you spending your time in different ways. If you spend a lot of your time staring at a computer screen for example, it’s great to complement that with something that gets you out in the world or using your hands in some way. Second, recognize that we become expert at things when we immerse fully for a while. So pace yourself, giving yourself time to do that before jumping into a new arena. Finally, recognize that some pursuits are easy to pair and others more complicated.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

How To Recharge Your Career In The Second Half Of Life

Story image for Career from Forbes

Researchers are predicting that scientific advances could have millennials living to 100 or longer; the standard 30- to 40-year career could be extended by a decade or two. Combine that with the speed of technological advances, plus the fact that jobs we have never heard of will emerge as the hottest roles to have. What will the future of careers look like and how can we prepare for that now?

I sat down with an old friend, Marci Alboher, who is a leading expert in encore careers – finding meaningful work in the second half of life. When I first met Marci, she had coined the term “slash” as it relates to careers and lifestyle. She had just published her first book, One Person/Multiple Careers – a roadmap for building a life that embraces the slash lifestyle and the concept of custom-blending a career.

Today she is one of the leaders in the encore movement, serving as a VP at Encore.org, which is innovating new models to tap the talent of people 50+ as a force for good. Her latest latest book, The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life, takes some of her earlier thinking and applies it to retirement: reinvented, re-envisioned, and reinvigorated.

I asked her what mindset we need to adopt so we can remain relevant and fulfilled in the rapidly changing landscape of extended careers. She shared four fundamental actions we can take to ensure success and happiness in that second chapter.

1. Cultivate your slashes.

William Arruda: What does “cultivate your slashes” mean, and how do we go about doing it?

Marci Alboher: When I wrote the slash book more than ten years ago, I had noticed that juggling various work identities concurrently — the website designer / yoga instructor, caterer / teacher — was starting to go mainstream. Slashing is now less exotic. In fact, millennials just consider this the normal way of living!  If you can work anywhere with an internet connection, it’s easy to shift between very different kinds of work activities. A few things to consider: First, think about a balance that gets you using different parts of your brain or that gets you spending your time in different ways. If you spend a lot of your time staring at a computer screen for example, it’s great to complement that with something that gets you out in the world or using your hands in some way. Second, recognize that we become expert at things when we immerse fully for a while. So pace yourself, giving yourself time to do that before jumping into a new arena. Finally, recognize that some pursuits are easy to pair and others more complicated.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

How to Prepare for Rising Student Loan Interest Rates

Image result for How to Prepare for Rising Student Loan Interest Rates

Federal student loan interest rates just went up again for the second year in a row.

Interest rates for student loans borrowed under the Department of Education’s direct program rose by 0.6 percent for the 2018-2019 school year. Undergraduate direct loans now carry the highest interest rate since the 2009-2010 year during the Great Recession. Effective July 1, undergraduates who take out a federal direct loan will now borrow at a 5.05 interest rate – a 13 percent increase compared to the 3.76 percent rate from the prior school year.

Graduate students will also pay more. The new interest rate for a graduate unsubsidized direct loan is 6.6 percent – up from 6 percent from the 2017-2018 school year – and the rate for a PLUS loan for either graduate students or parents is now a staggering 7.6 percent – the highest rate in more than five years.

Over the last two years, federal student loan rates have risen by 1.29 percentage points.

The current system for setting rates on direct loans has only been in place since July 2013 and was introduced under the Obama administration. Under this system, the Department of Education changes fixed-interest rates on direct loans each year based on the 10-year Treasury note auction in May.

Student loan experts say consumers should expect interest rate hikes on federal student loans to become the new normal. College students may see higher rates each year they take out a federal loan, they say.

“The trends and predictions indicate that interest rates are going to continue to trend up,” says Amy Glynn, vice president of financial aid and community initiatives at CampusLogic, a software company that provides student financial services. “The current rates for the 18-19 aid year are inching closer the statutory maximum interest rates.”



Increases in interest rates make higher education even more expensive. A higher interest rate can raise monthly loan payments and total repayment costs when borrowers are paying back thousands of dollars. A college grad paying back $30,000 in student loans can rack up around $8,721 in interest under the standard 10-year repayment plan at the new rate of 5.05 percent. Compare that with the direct undergraduate interest rate from two years ago under the same plan, which was $6,039.

[Read: How to Learn About College Affordability in High School.]

Amid rising interest rates, here are a few strategies for current and prospective students to reduce the amount they pay in interest on student loans.

Students should limit borrowing. Students and parents should try to reduce reliance on student loans, experts say.

One way to reduce student loan dependence is to limit borrowing to direct costs, the amount actually billed by a college, and cover living expenses by alternative means like working, says Glynn, who used to work as a financial aid director at the Santa Fe University of Art and Design.

“Alternatives like 529 plans, scholarships, payment plans and employer reimbursement should seriously be considered by families to reduce reliance on student loans,” she says.

Private education loans may be cheaper than parent PLUS loans. Parents who are paying for college with loans should look at the private lending market before signing on with a federal parent PLUS loan, says Stephen Dash, founder and CEO of Credible.com, a multilender marketplace focused on student loans. He adds that parent PLUS loans are different than other federal student loans because these loans don’t carry the same protections, such as eligibility for several different types of income-based repayment plans.There’s also an upfront disbursement fee associated with the PLUS loan – it puts the APR at over 8 percent. So if you qualify for a private loan and you’re looking at PLUS loans versus private loans, private loans can make a lot of sense because you are comparing an apples-to-apples comparison,” he says.

MBA students may find better rates in the private market. “Graduate schools students, such as MBAs, who are unlikely to be in a loan forgiveness program should be particularly hard hit,” says Alexander Lowry, a professor of finance at Gordon College in Massachusetts.

Lowry says MBA students are paying hefty tuition, sometimes more than $100,000 for their education, and are unlikely post-graduation to go into the nonprofit and public sector, where the federal Public Service Loan Forgiveness could be an option. PSLF discharges student debt for eligible borrowers after they’ve made 120 on-time payments.

But experts says there are alternatives, such as specialized MBA loans that offer lower interest rates compared with federal graduate loans, which include PLUS and direct graduate Stafford. Direct graduate Stafford loans typically carry a lower interest rate than graduate PLUS loans, but there’s an allowable maximum borrowing limit of $20,500 per academic year.

The current fixed rate for a 10-year fixed-rate loan for MBA students at New York-based CommonBond starts at 6.58 percent – more than a 1 percentage point difference compared with graduate PLUS loans. Discover Student Loans, headquartered in Illinois, offers variable rates as low as 3.99 percent for MBA students.

“When it comes to the graduate Stafford loan, you want to be confident that you would never need those protections. And it depends on the saving as well,” Dash says.

For some graduate students, he says, it can be worth paying extra in interest for federal student loans because of their protections, such as possible loan forgiveness and flexible repayment plans. “The additional cost is like an insurance premium,” he says.

Trying to fund your education? Get tips and more in the U.S. News Paying for Collegecenter.

Source:-usnews.

Scrum will put your project management career on track — learn how for only $39

Scrum will put your project management career on track — learn how for only $39

If you’re familiar with project management, then you’re also likely familiar with Agile. And for those who use the methodical approach to getting a software product from idea to store shelves, the Agile offshoot Scrum is one of the most popular project frameworks in the industry.

Right now, you can go deep inside Scrum and how it can impact everyone involved in the development process with the Complete Learn to Scrum course bundle. The package (a $1,140 value) is on sale right now for just $39 from TNW Deals.

This collection includes five separate courses, each contoured to address different employee groups and their place in the overall Scrum process. Scrum focuses on helping team members set short-term goals, and use those regular guide points to help cut down on unexpected surprises, control risk, and ultimately bring a successful project in on-time, on-budget, and up to everyone’s expectations.

Whether you’re learning Scrum for the first time, working to master your skills, or already a dedicated practitioner, this collection of instruction breaks down the steps for using, managing, or even owning product development from start to finish.

This training will also prepare you to achieve PMI certification as a project manager, a highly-valued accreditation that routinely boosts job prospects significantly.

At over 90 percent off its regular price, you can pick up the entire package at the wallet-friendly price of only $39.

source_tnw