Working hard for your MBA? These key points can lead you ahead in Business Management

Working hard for your MBA? These key points can lead you ahead in Business Management

There is always a constant debate when it comes to factorizing a new business idea- either stride into it or pick an MBA before doing so. Choosing the former, after gaining a professional experience in IT for two years, I ventured into start-up space along with a bunch of friends.

Despite earning a fair number of returns, must say that opting for a one year MBA program to enhance my managerial skills turned out to be the best decision so far.

Benefits of Business Schools

It is true that a B-School experience gives you that extra edge:

  • More than what you read from a textbook, it provides you an open platform
  • Learning from the experts directly
  • Exposure to meet and interact with industry professionals
  • An opportunity to network
  • Work on assignments
  • Live chat sessions
  • Case studies and group discussions
  • Entrepreneurship lessons across sectors
  • Ability to put out a business plan with a 24-hour deadline

So, is that all? No.

In fact, the most important and real-world lessons come after adapting these above-mentioned advantages that lead you to go beyond and look ahead of the curve once you step into corporate or entrepreneurial venture i.e., how to prepare and execute an idea to stimulate the business further.

Be an existing or budding entrepreneur or those who wish to climb up the ladder in an organization, an MBA degree has its own stand point. The initial stage of the one year MBA programme exposed to mild and crisp details of all the courses available, now, halfway through it, I have a holistic view of business that helps me see the bigger picture.

Here are some of the key takeaways which I am sure most of you out there would be able to relate to or begin to look at Masters of Business Administration from a different perspective:

Research:

Research has always been a primary part of any business. Before pitching for new business/ or product launch, a thorough ‘Market Research’ should be executed.

A strong knowledge and how to nurture these skills are provided hands-on if you are in a B-School as it helps in identifying the risk factors, sales targets, understanding and improvising customer relationship and keeping a track on brand reputation, in turn, eventually leading to growth in business.

[“source=vogue”]

Working hard for your MBA? These key points can lead you ahead in Business Management

Working hard for your MBA? These key points can lead you ahead in Business Management

There is always a constant debate when it comes to factorizing a new business idea- either stride into it or pick an MBA before doing so. Choosing the former, after gaining a professional experience in IT for two years, I ventured into start-up space along with a bunch of friends.

Despite earning a fair number of returns, must say that opting for a one year MBA program to enhance my managerial skills turned out to be the best decision so far.

Benefits of Business Schools

It is true that a B-School experience gives you that extra edge:

  • More than what you read from a textbook, it provides you an open platform
  • Learning from the experts directly
  • Exposure to meet and interact with industry professionals
  • An opportunity to network
  • Work on assignments
  • Live chat sessions
  • Case studies and group discussions
  • Entrepreneurship lessons across sectors
  • Ability to put out a business plan with a 24-hour deadline

So, is that all? No.

In fact, the most important and real-world lessons come after adapting these above-mentioned advantages that lead you to go beyond and look ahead of the curve once you step into corporate or entrepreneurial venture i.e., how to prepare and execute an idea to stimulate the business further.

Be an existing or budding entrepreneur or those who wish to climb up the ladder in an organization, an MBA degree has its own stand point. The initial stage of the one year MBA programme exposed to mild and crisp details of all the courses available, now, halfway through it, I have a holistic view of business that helps me see the bigger picture.

Here are some of the key takeaways which I am sure most of you out there would be able to relate to or begin to look at Masters of Business Administration from a different perspective:

Research:

Research has always been a primary part of any business. Before pitching for new business/ or product launch, a thorough ‘Market Research’ should be executed.

A strong knowledge and how to nurture these skills are provided hands-on if you are in a B-School as it helps in identifying the risk factors, sales targets, understanding and improvising customer relationship and keeping a track on brand reputation, in turn, eventually leading to growth in business.

Perception:

Now, from the research data collected, based on the competition and customer feedbacks, a new innovative strategy is conceptualized that will distinguish the brand from other players in the market.

But, before proceeding to this stage, a key point to keep in mind here is Consumer Perception – What your customers actually think about your company? Their experience with your products? etc.

This is exactly where a ‘Marketing management & Strategy’ course comes into play as it educates you with concepts comprising of brand awareness and helps you to reach the desired customer segment.

For instance, nowadays, when I look at commercials, the focus goes on the pitch and strategy part, rather than the making.

Operations:

Overall productivity of business will take place only when operational elements like planning, organizing, monitoring are set in place.

Right from pricing, budget allocations for each department, collecting and collating information, employee management to customer management, ‘Operations’, as a major or elective in a B-school, molds you with theories and practical skills to manage day-to-day activities as the business expands.

Risk-taking and negotiation:

Handling risk is absolutely a critical factor in a business setting because it supports in identifying frauds and deals with crisis management.

An MBA helps you focus on the principles, allows practicing ‘Risk Management’ through case studies, live projects, and how to leverage business opportunities.

It also throws additional light on the local as well as global perspective on the current issues and teaches how to identify and analyze risks within a framework.

The same applies to Negotiation. If you are planning a career in business, then you must be a good negotiator as well. B school learning enables you to achieve that by preparing you with strategies from analytical and behavioral perspective.

Communication & Technology:

One of the crucial aspects used by organizations and business leaders of today is Communication. From writing to positioning one self and the brand, ‘Business communication’ has been taught thoroughly by B schools.

With digital media taking over, institutes are also training students with practical skills that further assists to overcome challenges in the corporate world.

I never felt the need of Analytics, but had my startup expanded, it would have been a must. Now that I have chosen AIMLA (Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Analytics) amongst others electives, it is giving ample exposure to basic concepts of the disruptive technologies that are occurring in the industry.

All the above-mentioned courses are offered under essential ‘core courses’ by MBA institutes across the country.

And, if one is part of an institution that has best faculty quality and business relevance curriculum including the latest tech trends such as AIMLA, he/she can always look over the horizon on what is next and advance ahead.

[“source=indiatoday]

3 ways to get other people to pay off your student loans

 

3 ways to get other people to pay off your student loans

3 ways to get other people to pay off your student loans   10:50 AM ET Mon, 15 Oct 2018 | 01:23

This holiday season could be a good time to knock down your student debt.

Gift of College, an education registry, lets people register their student loan account, and then share their profile with friends and family who can contribute funds toward your loans.

“Wouldn’t you rather get Aunt Emma to kick in toward your student loans than give you another ugly sweater for Christmas?” said Nadine Perry, director of marketing at Gift of College.

If you’re doing gift swaps with your friends, you can even ask for a Gift of College gift card, which can be redeemed as a payment into any student loan account. (Here’s a directory of where the cards are sold).

As student debt grows, so do the plans to squelch it.

Some of the ideas are pretty creative: New Jersey, for example, considered establishing a lottery for borrowers burdened by student debt. Other ways of garnering money to eliminate your education debt don’t rely on luck, but rather require rolling up your sleeves or boning up on historical facts.

Keep in mind, however, that these endeavors aren’t free aid. The funds, even money offered by an organization in return for volunteer work, are taxable.

“All money you receive for volunteering or win on a trivia app or lottery is considered income by the IRS,” said Mark Kantrowitz, a student loan expert.

Here are some of the ways to get other people to pay off your debt.

1) At your job

Currently, just 4 percent of employers offer student debt assistance. But that’s changing as more employers come to realize education debt is a problem for many of their workers, said Katie Berliner, account executive at YouDecide, a benefits firm.

“In order to attract and retain talent, employers are looking at offering contributions to people’s student loans,” Berliner said.

Companies that have offered their employees help with their student loans include Aetna, Penguin Random House, Nvidia and Staples.

Fidelity announced this year that 25 employers — including Hewlett Packard Enterprise, New York Air Brake and Millennium Trust — plan to implement its student debt employer contribution program. (Fidelity also offers a student debt benefit for its own employees.)

“Do a quick Google search and find the employers who are out there doing this,” Berliner said.

Most likely, the company you’re interviewing with won’t offer the benefit, but that shouldn’t stop you from asking about it, Berliner said. “In the course of the interview, there comes a point where the interviewer says, ‘Do you have any questions?'” Berliner said. “It would not be out of line to say: ‘I want to get your perspective on whether you think this a valuable benefit.'”

2) By volunteering

Borrowers can enroll with Shared Harvest Fund. Users create a profile and list the social causes they’re interested in, such as gender equality or homelessness. You’ll work on projects for nonprofits and businesses and receive a monthly stipend of $250 to $1,000.

Although the work will start off in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York, “eventually, people can live in Arkansas and do work for a nonprofit in Los Angeles,” said NanaEfua B.A.M, founder of Shared Harvest Fund.

3) Apps/online

Givling is an app that lets student loan borrowers play trivia, with the winning team each week earning roughly $5,000 per person. “Some people are not the best trivia players, but they’re motivated to get help with their student loans,” said Seth Beard, Givling’s chief marketing officer.

The app ChangeEd will put your spare change toward your student loan payments. For example, if you buy a $1.75 coffee, 25 cents will go toward your debt.

[“source=ndtv”]

3 Ways To Jumpstart Your Career This Summer

Summer is the prime time to get a jumpstart on your career. Work is slower and the days are longer, leaving you with more time to invest in yourself and your development. Whether you’re looking for a new job, working towards a promotion, or happy in your current role, you should always devote time to building your career.

Summer is usually a bit slower for most businesses, which means you have more time to build connections. Reach out to at least one person in your network that you haven’t been in contact with recently and set up a coffee meeting or phone call. Send a catch up email to someone from the last networking event you attended to touch base with them. You don’t always have to have a specific agenda to meet someone. It can be nice to just touch base and stay at the top of someone’s mind.

If you’re looking to change careers, reach out to someone at a company you’d like to work for. Learn about their role, their bosses, and what they like and don’t like about their job. If you’re working towards a promotion, find someone in the role you’re aspiring to. They don’t have to be at your company. Talk to them about how they got their job, and see if they have any recommendations for skills you should learn or ways to position yourself as the right candidate for that role.

In general, reach out to at least one new person every week. If you’re job searching, aim for connecting with five people each week. Remember that you won’t hear back from everyone. It’s not personal – perhaps they’re busy, the email you have isn’t one they use anymore or check often, or your message got lost in the sea of hundreds they receive daily. It’s always good to reach out twice. Wait about a week and then send another message with a friendly response checking to see if they received your previous email.

Learn a new skill.

A foolproof way to move your career forward is by learning. This can be done in a formal way by taking a class, or informally by studying on your own. Taking a group class or workshop is also another great way to expand your network and meet new people. What better time than the summer to learn something new? Take advantage of the slower pace of work and the days it’s too hot to go outside and fill them with something productive.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

Want your child to study abroad? Here are the best cities for international students

1. London | Highest-ranked institution: UCL (University College London) | Population: 13,880,000 | Average international fees: $21,200 | Employer Activity rank: 2 (Image: Reuters)

1. London | Highest-ranked institution: UCL (University College London) | Population: 13,880,000 | Average international fees: $21,200 | Employer Activity rank: 2 (Image: Reuters)

2. Tokyo | Highest-ranked institution: University of Tokyo | Population: 37,800,000 | Average international fees: $6,700 | Employer Activity rank: 1 (Image: Reuters)

2/10

2. Tokyo | Highest-ranked institution: University of Tokyo | Population: 37,800,000 | Average international fees: $6,700 | Employer Activity rank: 1 (Image: Reuters)

3. Melbourne | Highest-ranked institution: University of Melbourne | Population: 4,530,000 | Average international fees: $23,300 | Employer Activity rank: 10 (Image: Reuters)

3/10

3. Melbourne | Highest-ranked institution: University of Melbourne | Population: 4,530,000 | Average international fees: $23,300 | Employer Activity rank: 10 (Image: Reuters)

4. Montréal | Highest-ranked institution: McGill University | Population: 4,127,000 | Average international fees: $13,200 | Employer Activity rank: 20 (Image: Reuters)

4/10

4. Montréal | Highest-ranked institution: McGill University | Population: 4,127,000 | Average international fees: $13,200 | Employer Activity rank: 20 (Image: Reuters)

5. Paris | Highest-ranked institution: ENS Paris | Population: 12,405,000 | Average international fees: $3,400 | Employer Activity rank: 7 (Image: Reuters)

5/10

5. Paris | Highest-ranked institution: ENS Paris | Population: 12,405,000 | Average international fees: $3,400 | Employer Activity rank: 7 (Image: Reuters)

6. Munich | Highest-ranked institution: Technische Universität München | Population: 2,600,000 | Average international fees: $100 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

6/10

6. Munich | Highest-ranked institution: Technische Universität München | Population: 2,600,000 | Average international fees: $100 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

7. Berlin | Highest-ranked institution: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Population: 6,005,000 | Average international fees: $2000 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

7/10

7. Berlin | Highest-ranked institution: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin | Population: 6,005,000 | Average international fees: $2000 | Employer Activity rank: 23 (Image: Reuters)

8. Zurich | Highest-ranked institution: ETH Zurich | Population: 1,900,000 | Average international fees: $1,900 | Employer Activity rank: 6 (Image: Reuters)

8/10

8. Zurich | Highest-ranked institution: ETH Zurich | Population: 1,900,000 | Average international fees: $1,900 | Employer Activity rank: 6 (Image: Reuters)

9. Sydney | Highest-ranked institution: The University of New South Wales | Population: 4,921,000 | Average international fees: $26,400 | Employer Activity rank: 13 (Image: Reuters)

9/10

9. Sydney | Highest-ranked institution: The University of New South Wales | Population: 4,921,000 | Average international fees: $26,400 | Employer Activity rank: 13 (Image: Reuters)

10. Seoul | Highest-ranked institution: Seoul National University (SNU) | Population: 25,000,000 | Average international fees: $6,500 | Employer Activity rank: 4 (Image: Reuters)

10/10

10. Seoul | Highest-ranked institution: Seoul National University (SNU) | Population: 25,000,000 | Average international fees: $6,500 | Employer Activity rank: 4 (Image: Reuters)

source:-moneycontl

How Much Do You Own Your Career?

Suppose you buy the principle from my previous article that you need to own your career. You understand that you live in an innovation-driven economy, your learning must keep pace and employability is your responsibility. How, then, can you apply the principle of career ownership to yourself?

Career ownership is a natural extension of living in a democratic society, and exercising choice. Moreover, your career is not a physical artifact, like a dining table, that can stay in the same condition for a lifetime. Your career is always in a state of flux: shaping, and being shaped by, the outside environment. Here are some questions you can ask to test where you stand right now.

Where can you go? This first question calls for you to look beyond what’s familiar. What is the wider market for the work you can do, and the further learning that you seek? Do you have the skills to do something different? What do you know about employers that may value your talents? Are there opportunities for you to work in virtual space, from your own home? Whom can you talk to in order to find out more information? Are there part-time, or contract work or volunteer opportunities that can help you go in a new direction?

Who’s supporting you? Owning your career ought not to be a solitary activity. On the contrary, having friends, family, colleagues, and mentors who support you is an essential part of career ownership. Within this overall group you can identify a smaller group, an imaginary “board of directors” that you hold in high regard. What does your imaginary board look like? What kind of board vacancy would you like to fill? You can expect fluidity among your supporters, including adding new ones in return for favors you did them. In this way, effective “give and take” can play an important part in developing your support system over time.

Where’s your reputation? This question differs from the previous one. Its focus is on the people—bosses, customers, project team members, occupational peers and so on—who have directly experienced your work and respect what you can do. Over time, you can expect your reputation to become scattered across a wider area. Moreover, you don’t need to move to grow your reputation. That can happen through other people moving, and taking your reputation to new places. Many career moves stem from an unanticipated phone call from a former co-worker who knows your worth.

Who’s your agent? You will be familiar with the idea of an agent from the worlds of professional sports, or movie-making or the theater. You may not think you need any equivalent in your own career. However, it’s important to see that your agent may not be an individual person, but a function performed by a range of people. It’s common for bosses, co-workers, headhunters, and contractors from the past to want to work with you again. It’s useful to map out who those people are, and to keep in touch so that they stand ready to help again as your career moves forward.

What’s the next step? The most important point here is that you take a next step, and in turn another, and another. You may be under a lot of pressure to deliver results in your present job, or have little free time, or have family obligations that restrict what you’d really like to do. However, to practice career ownership you owe it to yourself to do something, however small a step that may be. That something can lead to a fresh round of experimentation that leads in turn to a new door of opportunity.sking where can you go, who’s supporting you, where’s your reputation, who’s your agent and what’s the next step can make you a more informed contributor to a democratic society. They can also take you a long way toward owning your career.

Source:-.forbes

How to Recharge Your Career In The Second Half Of Life

Story image for Career from Forbes

Researchers are predicting that scientific advances could have millennials living to 100 or longer; the standard 30- to 40-year career could be extended by a decade or two. Combine that with the speed of technological advances, plus the fact that jobs we have never heard of will emerge as the hottest roles to have. What will the future of careers look like and how can we prepare for that now?

I sat down with an old friend, Marci Alboher, who is a leading expert in encore careers – finding meaningful work in the second half of life. When I first met Marci, she had coined the term “slash” as it relates to careers and lifestyle. She had just published her first book, One Person/Multiple Careers – a roadmap for building a life that embraces the slash lifestyle and the concept of custom-blending a career.

Today she is one of the leaders in the encore movement, serving as a VP at Encore.org, which is innovating new models to tap the talent of people 50+ as a force for good. Her latest latest book, The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life, takes some of her earlier thinking and applies it to retirement: reinvented, re-envisioned, and reinvigorated.

I asked her what mindset we need to adopt so we can remain relevant and fulfilled in the rapidly changing landscape of extended careers. She shared four fundamental actions we can take to ensure success and happiness in that second chapter.

1. Cultivate your slashes.

William Arruda: What does “cultivate your slashes” mean, and how do we go about doing it?

Marci Alboher: When I wrote the slash book more than ten years ago, I had noticed that juggling various work identities concurrently — the website designer / yoga instructor, caterer / teacher — was starting to go mainstream. Slashing is now less exotic. In fact, millennials just consider this the normal way of living!  If you can work anywhere with an internet connection, it’s easy to shift between very different kinds of work activities. A few things to consider: First, think about a balance that gets you using different parts of your brain or that gets you spending your time in different ways. If you spend a lot of your time staring at a computer screen for example, it’s great to complement that with something that gets you out in the world or using your hands in some way. Second, recognize that we become expert at things when we immerse fully for a while. So pace yourself, giving yourself time to do that before jumping into a new arena. Finally, recognize that some pursuits are easy to pair and others more complicated.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

How To Recharge Your Career In The Second Half Of Life

Story image for Career from Forbes

Researchers are predicting that scientific advances could have millennials living to 100 or longer; the standard 30- to 40-year career could be extended by a decade or two. Combine that with the speed of technological advances, plus the fact that jobs we have never heard of will emerge as the hottest roles to have. What will the future of careers look like and how can we prepare for that now?

I sat down with an old friend, Marci Alboher, who is a leading expert in encore careers – finding meaningful work in the second half of life. When I first met Marci, she had coined the term “slash” as it relates to careers and lifestyle. She had just published her first book, One Person/Multiple Careers – a roadmap for building a life that embraces the slash lifestyle and the concept of custom-blending a career.

Today she is one of the leaders in the encore movement, serving as a VP at Encore.org, which is innovating new models to tap the talent of people 50+ as a force for good. Her latest latest book, The Encore Career Handbook: How to Make a Living and a Difference in the Second Half of Life, takes some of her earlier thinking and applies it to retirement: reinvented, re-envisioned, and reinvigorated.

I asked her what mindset we need to adopt so we can remain relevant and fulfilled in the rapidly changing landscape of extended careers. She shared four fundamental actions we can take to ensure success and happiness in that second chapter.

1. Cultivate your slashes.

William Arruda: What does “cultivate your slashes” mean, and how do we go about doing it?

Marci Alboher: When I wrote the slash book more than ten years ago, I had noticed that juggling various work identities concurrently — the website designer / yoga instructor, caterer / teacher — was starting to go mainstream. Slashing is now less exotic. In fact, millennials just consider this the normal way of living!  If you can work anywhere with an internet connection, it’s easy to shift between very different kinds of work activities. A few things to consider: First, think about a balance that gets you using different parts of your brain or that gets you spending your time in different ways. If you spend a lot of your time staring at a computer screen for example, it’s great to complement that with something that gets you out in the world or using your hands in some way. Second, recognize that we become expert at things when we immerse fully for a while. So pace yourself, giving yourself time to do that before jumping into a new arena. Finally, recognize that some pursuits are easy to pair and others more complicated.

[“Source-timesofindia”]

Why you shouldn’t spend your whole time travelling when studying abroad

oskar-krawczyk-172848-unsplash-1200x340

If you’re studying abroad, it’s likely that you love the sweet taste of adventure. You’ve been bitten by the travel bug and want to venture to every town, city and country within a reasonable distance of your student dwellings.

But, while filling your weekends with travel might seem like the best idea, the reality is that it might not be so wise…

Studying abroad is a magical experience which is bound to go by in a flash so you’ll want to make the most of it. For some, this means packing up your suitcase and hopping on a plane at every opportunity you get.

fancycrave-355349-unsplash

Travelling is often a wonderful, mind-opening experience, but be careful not to miss the action right in front of you. Source: Fancycrave/Unsplash

And while this is likely to be hugely rewarding, you might miss out on a few wonders back in your host country.

If your semester breaks and weekends are spent elsewhere you’ll miss out on all the fun happening right in front of you.

Instead, why not commit to a stay-cation? Go on ‘holiday’ in your host country, explore the city as a tourist, go to all the hidden places you don’t normally venture out to and treat yourself a little!

You just might discover things about the city you live in that you didn’t even know before.

You picked to study in that country for a reason, right? Maybe you loved the food or the weather, the people or the culture, perhaps it was the language or the academic reputation. Whatever it was that drew you there, there was a reason.

fancycrave-355349-unsplash giphy

You were excited when you moved there, right? So don’t go! Source: Giphy

Remind yourself of this and then make the most of it.

If you love the food, organise a food tour with some friends and travel around the city trying different delicacies. If it’s adventure you’re interested in, do some research and ask what exciting ventures are on offer for adrenaline-junkies or keen explorers. We bet there’s heaps to do!

And at the end of it all, you can go back to your student accommodation and relax for free, not to a shabby hostel you picked because it fit your student budget or a nice hotel that drained your bank balance.

While, if you have the money, travelling is a great way to spend your time and broaden your mind, you might want to look at all the wonders right in front of you before you board that plane.

Take it slow, soak up the culture, and enjoy the country you’re studying in. Remember the reason you chose it in the first place and appreciate it while you can. It’ll all be over before you know it and it will certainly be cheaper to buy a plane ticket than to invest in another degree abroad!

[“source=cnbc”]

Your guide to becoming a DevOps engineer starts with these six online courses

Take these six courses and you'll be on your way to becoming a DevOps engineer.

The DevOps approach has helped businesses all over the world speed up their development processes, deploy more frequently, and ensure a high standard of quality with every release. In other words? Be more successful.

In fact, businesses that hire for DevOps skills can often see a boost in deployment frequency and fewer failures. Despite this tremendous boon, the companies that have DevOps engineers on staff are still in the minority. While that’s bad news for them, it might be good news for you if you’re considering a career in this booming field. The demand is high. The competition is low. It’s time to take the leap.

To get you started, we’ve laid out six crucial DevOps competencies — first defined by The New Stack — that you’ll need to get your foot in the door. And once you know your trajectory, you can start training towards it with the Pay What You Want DevOps Bundle, $834 worth of online instruction for the price of your choosing. Here are the skills:

1. Collaboration

DevOps was born out of the historically terrible working relationships between development and IT operations teams. But DevOps practitioners consider it crucial to collaborate with not just IT, but multiple teams across an organization, from QA teams to business teams. If you want to make a dent in a company’s productivity as a DevOps engineer, you best learn to tear down the silos and make inroads all across the office.

2. Automation

A crucial part of the DevOps ethos is simplifying and streamlining the end-to-end development process with the help of automation. Two of the most commonly used DevOps tools for aiding automation are Docker and Jenkins, so be sure to bone up on both in preparation for your DevOps job hunt.

3. Continuous integration

The larger a dev team grows, the more likely it is that defects will be introduced into a large code base, and the harder it becomes to identify and fix those mistakes. Continuous integration solves for that by creating a “security checkpoint” wherein any change must undergo immediate testing and reporting, every time. If you want to “integrate” with your new DevOps teammates, you should get used to providing thorough documentation and rapid feedback on any contribution, and familiarize yourself with the tools used to build continuous integration pipelines (like the aforementioned Jenkins).

4. Continuous testing

Remember when we mentioned collaboration with QA teams was a tenet of DevOps? Continuous testing is why. Thorough testing can’t be done in a vacuum. More errors can be caught early when developers double-check their own code before sending to QA, provide test data sets, and help to configure testing environments. Because of this, successful DevOps engineers must be meticulous and willing to offer assistance to test engineers whenever possible.

5. Continuous delivery

Due to the continuous integration and testing practices inherent in a DevOps workflow, all code should be in a consistently deployable state during any given step of the process. This vastly reduces the complexity of an individual release and thus allows much higher release frequency. In other words, a steady stream of reliable, iterative updates, instead of one unwieldy update that’s only been tested on the way out the door. The practice of continuous delivery calls for engineers who can move quickly and finish what they start without sacrificing accuracy.

6. Continuous monitoring

Even though DevOps enhances overall quality and lowers the rate of release failure, nobody is perfect. Glitches are inevitable — the process actually counts on it. Continuous monitoring aims to find and fix errors in real time. Once the underlying cause of an error is understood, that information can be used to monitor development and other steps in the process, filtering out errors long before they can make it to production. A savvy DevOps engineer should always be ready to correct mistakes and know how to spot them in all other stages as well.

If you think you’ve got what it takes to put this DevOps theory into practice, grab the Pay What You Want DevOps Bundle now.

 source:-mashable